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Earle, Swepson. The Eastern Shore of Maryland: Its History, Traditions, Architecture, and Waters. Baltimore: Union Trust Co., [1930].
Earle, Swepson. Southern Maryland: Its History, Traditions, Architecture, and Waters. Baltimore: Union Trust Co., [1930].
Linebaugh, Donald W. "'All the Annoyances and Inconveniences of the Country': Environmental Factors in the Development of Outbuildings in the Colonial Chesapeake." Winterthur Portfolio 28 (Spring 1994): 1-18.
Sarudy, Barbara Wells. Gardens and Gardening in the Chesapeake, 1700-1805. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Gardens are the result of a particular culture and are an outward sign of a special grace, according to Maryland architecture writer H. Chandlee Forman. Early gardens reflected the tastes and enthusiasms of their owners as much as did their mansions. The author's engaging account of the significance of the domestic landscape to its proprietors and their visitors includes color illustrations of several of the estates.
Selig, Jerome D. "Reconstruction of the C&O Canal." Maryland Conservationist 53 (May/June 1977): 16-19.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Buckeystown." Frederick Magazine (November 1990): 11-2.
Love, Richard. "Brunswick's 'Blessed Curse': Surviving an Industrial Legacy." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Summer 1993): 133-49.
Annotation / Notes: Brunswick was a community tied together and given its identify by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. When the railroad left in the late twentieth century the town lost its identify and underwent a drastic change. It experienced a period of crisis where the whole concept of community was called into question.
Trostel, Michael F. "Mondawmin: Baltimore's Lost County Estate." Bulletin of the Southern Garden History Society 8 (Summer 1991): 3-4.
Weeks, Christopher. "Bouncing Along the Post Road: Eighteenth Century Harford County as Seen by Travelers." Harford Historical Bulletin 57 (Summer 1993): 74-127.
Annotation / Notes: Annotated excerpts from ten contemporary descriptions of traveling along the post road. The authors include such well known Colonial figures as Dr. Alexander Hamilton, Charles Willson Peale, and Benjamin Henry Latrobe.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Brigham, David R. "'Ask the Beasts and They Shall Teach Thee:' The Human Lessons of Charles Willson Peale's Natural History Displays." Huntington Library Quarterly 59 (nos. 2-3, 1998): 182-206.
McCormick, Kathleen. "Buried Treasures." Historic Preservation 45 (July/August 1993): 68, 70-71.
Annotation / Notes: Garden at William Paca House.
McCormick, Kathleen. "Splendor on the Grass." Historic Preservation 42 (November/December 1990): 56-57, 69.
Annotation / Notes: Ladew Topiary Gardens.
McCormick, Kathleen. "Digging into the Past: Paleontology at CMM." Bugeye Times 20 (Winter 1995/96): 1, 6.
Dowell, Susan Stiles. "The Harvey Ladew Manor House & Gardens." Maryland Magazine 17 (Summer 1985): 42-45.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Harvey Ladew and his house and garden, now open to the public. The topiary garden is considered one of the nation's finest.
Reed, Paula Stoner. Building with Stone in the Cumberland Valley: A Study of Regional Environmental, Technical, and Cultural Factors in Stone Construction. Ph.D. diss., George Washington University, 1988.