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Dash, Joan. Summoned to Jerusalem: The Life of Henrietta Szold. New York: Harper and Row, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Henrietta Szold (1860-1945) was a social activist whose career began in Baltimore with the founding of a center and night school for recent immigrants from Russia similar to the settlement houses pioneered by Jane Addams. She later founded Hadassah, the Jewish women's organization, and became a leader in the Zionist movement.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Aaron Aaronsohn; Pioneer Scientist, Spy and Friend of Henrietta Szold." Hadassah Magazine (March 1977): 16-17, 38-42.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. Henrietta Szold: Baltimorean. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Levin, Jack L. Sidney Hollander: Beloved Warrior. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Creagerstown." Frederick Magazine (January 1991): 9-10.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Emmistburg." Frederick Magazine (August 1992): 12-3.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Foxville." Frederick Magazine (September 1991): 18, 57.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Graceham." Frederick Magazine (August 1993): 16-17.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Lewistown." Frederick Magazine (April 1990): 11-12.
Liebowitz, Steve. "The End of a Jewish Neighborhood: The Life and Death of Lower Park Heights." Generations (Fall 1998): 4-7.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the move of the Jewish community (the people and their institutions) towards the suburbs. A move brought about, in large part, by racism and the search for greater social status.
Ryon, Roderick N. Northwest Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods, 1870-1970 Before "Smart Growth". Baltimore: University of Baltimore Press, 2000.
Hoffman, Hiram Alan. "Jewish Music Then and Now." Generations 5 (April 1985): 35-40.
Kares, M. "Baltimore: Center of German-American Organ Building." Tracker 39, no. 3 (1995): 10-17.
Wolf, Edward C. "Two Divergent Traditions of German-American Hymnody in Maryland circa 1800." American Music (Fall 1985): 299-312.
Fishman, Bernard P. "Back to East Baltimore. An Introduction to the New Jewish Heritage Center." Generations (Fall 1986): 10-11.
Fishman, Bernard P. "Making the Jewish Museum of Maryland." Generations (Fall 1998): 26-34.
Annotation / Notes: An involved discussion of the 1990s construction of the museum's new museum, complete with problems and foibles, written by the man who directed the project.
Jackl, W. E. "Station Number Eleven of the Enoch Pratt Free Library." Journal of Library History 7 (1972): 141-156.
Annotation / Notes: East Baltimore's Station Number Eleven, which began in two rooms in a settlement house was amazingly successful in servicing its Jewish immigrant population with very mere resources. This article includes some discussion in the early 20th century library controversy of whether or not libraries should collection non-English works. Also stressed is the role the public library played in the Americanization of the immigrant.
Key, Betty McKeever, comp. Oral History in Maryland: A Directory. Edited by Larry E. Sullivan. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1981.
Annotation / Notes: Although it is very outdated, this directory should serve be the starting point for anyone attempting to locate oral history collections relevant to Maryland. Collections surveyed were not only in institutional hands (schools, libraries, and historical agencies) but also belonged to governmental agencies and private individuals. Included are DC and PA collections of potential interest.
Atwood, Liz. "Jews in Maryland." Maryland 25 (Summer 1993): 19-25.
Zmora, Nurith. "A Rediscovery of the Asylum: The Hebrew Orphan Asylum Through the Lives of Its First Fifty Orphans." American Jewish History 72 (March 1988): 452-75.
Annotation / Notes: Examining the early history of the Baltimore Hebrew Orphan Asylum, established in 1873 in west Baltimore, Zmora provides evidence to refute the interpretation that such institutions were characterized by detention and represented the breakdown of family ties. Her study draws upon a variety of records to provide a profile of the orphanage's early inmates and the families from which they came. Zmora contends that the profile indicates the special vulnerability of young widows and the difficulty of placing orphaned siblings in the same home, but argues for the relative success of the institution in reuniting children with members of their families.
Kessler, Barry. Daughter of Zion: Henrietta Szold & American Jewish Womanhood. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1995.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Henrietta Szold and the Woman's Literary Club of Baltimore." Generations (Fall 1996): 14-15.
Levin, Alexandra Lee. "Henrietta Szold in Church Stained Glass." Generations (Fall 1996): 16.
Porges, Ida. "Remembering My Mother: Portrait of a Rebbetzin." American Jewish History 83 (1995): 331-36.