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Ballard, Barbara Jean. Nineteenth-Century Theories of Race, the Concept of Correspondences, and the Images of Blacks in the Anti-slavery Writings of Douglass, Stow, and Browne. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1992.
Yentsch, Anne. "Hot, Nourishing, and Culturally Potent: The Transfer of West African Cooking Traditions to the Chesapeake." Sage 9 (Summer 1995): 15-29.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Liebowitz, Steve. "The End of a Jewish Neighborhood: The Life and Death of Lower Park Heights." Generations (Fall 1998): 4-7.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the move of the Jewish community (the people and their institutions) towards the suburbs. A move brought about, in large part, by racism and the search for greater social status.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Olesker, Michael. Michael Olesker's Baltimore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Selection of columns from the News American and Baltimore Sun, covering the years 1979-1994. His topics include politicians, sports, eccentrics. He presents a loving picture of Baltimore during the last quarter of the twentieth century without overlooking the problems, such as crime, drugs, and poverty, which plague the city.
Ryon, Roderick N. Northwest Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods, 1870-1970 Before "Smart Growth". Baltimore: University of Baltimore Press, 2000.
Sween, Jane C. "An Englishwoman Visits Montgomery County in 1830." Montgomery County Story 40 (August 1997): 441-52.
Cameron, Mark. "Monuments of Urbanity: The Development of Baltimore's Residential Squares." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 5.
Capper, John, Garrett Power, and Frank Shivers. Chesapeake Waters: Pollution, Public Health and Public Opinion, 1602-1972. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1983.
Wennersten, John R. "Soil Miners Redux: The Chesapeake Environment, 1680-1810." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Summer 1996): 156-79.
Jackl, W. E. "Station Number Eleven of the Enoch Pratt Free Library." Journal of Library History 7 (1972): 141-156.
Annotation / Notes: East Baltimore's Station Number Eleven, which began in two rooms in a settlement house was amazingly successful in servicing its Jewish immigrant population with very mere resources. This article includes some discussion in the early 20th century library controversy of whether or not libraries should collection non-English works. Also stressed is the role the public library played in the Americanization of the immigrant.
Key, Betty McKeever, comp. Oral History in Maryland: A Directory. Edited by Larry E. Sullivan. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1981.
Annotation / Notes: Although it is very outdated, this directory should serve be the starting point for anyone attempting to locate oral history collections relevant to Maryland. Collections surveyed were not only in institutional hands (schools, libraries, and historical agencies) but also belonged to governmental agencies and private individuals. Included are DC and PA collections of potential interest.
Saye, Hymen. The Papers of Harry Greenstein: Saga of a Humanitarian. Baltimore: Jewish Historical Society of Maryland, 1976.
Atwood, Liz. "Jews in Maryland." Maryland 25 (Summer 1993): 19-25.
Beirne, D. Randall. "German Immigration to Nineteenth-Century Baltimore." Maryland Humanities (September/October 1994): 15-17.
Bonvillain, Dorothy Guy. Cultural Pluralism and the Americanization of Immigrants: The Role of Public Schools and Ethnic Communities, Baltimore, 1890-1920. Ph.D. diss., American University, 1999.
Cahn, Louis F. "Baltimore Jews and Baltimore Horses." Generations 3 (June 1982): 23-30.
Carey, George. "A Sampler of Baltimore's Folk Culture." Johns Hopkins Magazine 27 (January 1976): 8-12.
Annotation / Notes: George Carey, former Maryland state folklorist, notes that folklore often has been understood as applying to rural and traditional ways of life, but he insists that the concept is equally relevant for the study of urban settings like Baltimore. The most obvious examples he finds in the city's ethnic neighborhoods, both European and African American, including Ukrainian-American Easter egg designs, window screens painted by Czech-Americans, and African-American A-rabing (street hawker) cries, songs, and storytelling.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Essays on aspects of the social history of Baltimore provide case studies of social issues and neighborhood dynamics. Paired chapters first consider the lives of ordinary B&O Railroad workers involved in the railroad strike of 1877, then examine the powerful family of B&O magnate John Work Garrett. Chapters on work consider the area's mill villages, the garment industry, and union activity. Studies of neighborhoods address the history of Fells Point in terms of race and ethnicity and racial change in west Baltimore.
Feest, Christian F. "Ethnohistory, Moral History, and Colonial Maryland." Amerikastudien 28 (No. 4 1983): 429-433.