Search

1-18 of 18 results
Clayton, Ralph. Black Baltimore, 1820-1870. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.
Clayton, Ralph. Slavery, Slaveholding and the Free Black Population of Antebellum Baltimore. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Coates, James Roland, Jr. Recreation and Sport in the African-American Community of Baltimore, 1890-1920. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Della, M. Ray, Jr. "An Analysis of Baltimore's Population in the 1850's." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 20-35.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "The Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People, 1864-1870." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 369-404.
Annotation / Notes: In 1864, Baltimore businessmen, lawyers and clergymen formed the Baltimore Association for the Moral and Educational Improvement of the Colored People. Many of these men had been associated with emancipation causes. These men coordinated the flow of money and supplies provided by the Freedmen's Bureau. Eventually, the schools founded by the Association were taken over by the state, which had initially not provided for free, public Negro education at all.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Jacob, Grace Hill. The Negro in Baltimore, 1860-1900. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1945.
Katz, Sarah. "Rumors of Rebellion: Fear of a Slave Uprising in Post-Nat Turner Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 328-33.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Dürr, W. Theodore. "People of the Peninsula." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 27-53.
Annotation / Notes: Dürr presents a hundred year history (1880-1980) of four distinct south Baltimore neighborhoods -- South Baltimore (including Federal Hill), Locust Point, Riverside, and Sharp-Leadenhall. Although distinct neighborhoods they functioned as a cohesive region.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Merrill, Philip J., and Uluaipou-O-Malo Aiono. Baltimore. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Part of Arcadia's Black America Series, this photohistory, which uses a variety of graphic materials, gives a visual introduction to Baltimore as documented through the lives of its black citizens. Many of the photographs are the work of black photographers.
Ryon, Roderick N. Northwest Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods, 1870-1970 Before "Smart Growth". Baltimore: University of Baltimore Press, 2000.
Beirne, Francis F. "The Four Merchants." In The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Essays on aspects of the social history of Baltimore provide case studies of social issues and neighborhood dynamics. Paired chapters first consider the lives of ordinary B&O Railroad workers involved in the railroad strike of 1877, then examine the powerful family of B&O magnate John Work Garrett. Chapters on work consider the area's mill villages, the garment industry, and union activity. Studies of neighborhoods address the history of Fells Point in terms of race and ethnicity and racial change in west Baltimore.
Chew, Richard. "The Origins of Mob Town: Social Division and Racial Conflict in the Baltimore Riots of 1862." Maryland Historical Magazine, 104 (Fall 2009): 272-301.
Chew, Richard. "The Origins of Mob Town: Social Division and Racial Conflict in the Baltimore Riots of 1812." Maryland Historical Magazine, 107 (Spring 2012): 7-35.