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Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Benson, Robert Louis. "The Creation of Howard County." Anne Arundel County History Notes 26 (January 1995): 5-7.
Brooks, Richard O. New Towns and Communal Values: A Case Study of Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: This work is the product of the consultancy year the author spent with the Rouse Company. He includes a snapshot of residents at the time, such as their population characteristics and their reason for purchasing in Columbia. Included is a chapter on the now gone Antioch College.
Hattery, Thomas H., ed. Western Maryland : A Profile. Foreword by Charles McC. Mathias Jr. Mt. Airy, MD: Lomond Books, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: This work describes the Counties which make up Maryland's Sixth Congressional District. The chapters are written by individuals involved in current affairs. The focus is on politics, government, and the economic nature of the counties. There is a great deal of statistical information. Chapter VIII includes brief essays on the future of Western Maryland by notable Maryland Officials, such as Governor Hughes, the heads of various state agencies, and people of note in the counties.
Hattery, Thomas H., ed. "History of the Howard County Seal." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter 30 (September 1987): 2.
Nichols, Joseph H. Patriots and Pioneers of Howard County, Maryland: The Courthouse and the Jail. Columbia, MD: Howard County Genealogical Society, 1998.
Sword, Gerald J. "Acquisition of the Point Lookout Lighthouse Site by the United States Government from Jenifer Taylor." Chronicles of St. Mary's 26 (January 1978): 340-46.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855, Part I." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter (July 1986): 1-2.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855, Part II." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter (October 1986): 2.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855, Part III." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter (January 1987): 3.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855. Part IV." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter (April 1987): 3-4.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855, Part V." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter 31 (April 1988): 4.
Varga, Nicholas. "The Establishment of Howard County, 1850-1855, [Concluded] Part VI." Howard County Historical Society, Inc. Newsletter 31 (June 1988): 3.
Doyle, Francis R. Columbia, Maryland, The Planned Community Between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore Designed to Give A New Town to that Area: A Bibliography. Monticello, IL: Council of Planning Librarians, 1975.
Doyle, Francis R. A Guide to Maryland State Archives Holdings of Howard County Records on Microfilm. Annapolis: Maryland State Archives, 1989.
Arnold, Joseph L. The New Deal in the Suburbs: A History of the Greenbelt Town Program, 1935-1954. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1971.
Annotation / Notes: Considering the variety of Maryland's various planned communities - Columbia, Bowie, Greenbelt and Roland Park - it is important to appreciate how each was distinctive. At its conception, Greenbelt, along with several other communities planned and built by Rexford Guy Tugwell's Resettlement Administration, represented the social experimentation associated with New Deal. According to the author: "the greenbelt towns were built to demonstrate that urban expansion by the construction of complete new towns would provide superior safety, convenience, beauty, and a deep sense of community spirit - all at a new low cost. These new suburban towns would therefore provide a superior environment for families heretofore condemned to live in urban slums. New towns would stop urban decay and end economic segregation of the suburbs." (p. xii) What was radical was the comprehensive scope of the enterprise, the creation of co-operative businesses to serve the community, and the fact that the federal government maintained ownership. This study ends with the implementation of Public Law 65 (1949) which transferred ownership of most of the houses to a private co-operative.
Brooks, Richard. "Social Planning in Columbia." Journal of the American Institute of Planners 37 (1971): 373-378.
Annotation / Notes: An evaluation of the planned community of Columbia at an early point in its development, the article contends that the transition from vision to implementation involves a series of social dilemmas. These included the shift from company town to "thriving democratic polity," the potential conflict between the vision of a new form of urban community versus the prevailing attraction of the suburban ideal, and questions about the appropriate balance between residential and commercial functions in a presumably "post-industrial" society. Brooks wonders whether the failure by the planner and many early residents to face up to the challenges of these dilemmas may represent a "heroic failure" for Columbia.
Meyer, Eugene L. "When Laurel Liked Ike." Maryland Life, 6 (January/February 2010): 25-26.