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Bunting, Elaine, and Patricia D'Amario. Counties of Central Maryland. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A series designed for young people.
Adams, Cheryl, and Art Emerson. Religion Collections in Libraries and Archives: A Guide to Resources in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Washington: Humanities and Social Sciences Division, Library of Congress, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Institutional level descriptions for nineteen Maryland libraries and archives holding significant religious collections. A tremendous level of detail is given. Subject headings are assigned to each institution. This guide is also available online at https://www.loc.gov/rr/main/religion/.
Gelbert, Doug. Company Museums, Industry Museums, and Industrial Tours: A Guidebook of Sites in the United States That Are Open to the Public. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994. 94-104.
Annotation / Notes: Brief descriptions of fifteen industrial sites in Maryland. When considering sites on this topic most museum goers would probably know of the Baltimore Museum of Industry but people may overlook many of the other sites covered, such as the Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum, the Poultry Hall of Fame, and the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Visitor Center.
Arnold, Joseph L. The New Deal in the Suburbs: A History of the Greenbelt Town Program, 1935-1954. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1971.
Annotation / Notes: Considering the variety of Maryland's various planned communities - Columbia, Bowie, Greenbelt and Roland Park - it is important to appreciate how each was distinctive. At its conception, Greenbelt, along with several other communities planned and built by Rexford Guy Tugwell's Resettlement Administration, represented the social experimentation associated with New Deal. According to the author: "the greenbelt towns were built to demonstrate that urban expansion by the construction of complete new towns would provide superior safety, convenience, beauty, and a deep sense of community spirit - all at a new low cost. These new suburban towns would therefore provide a superior environment for families heretofore condemned to live in urban slums. New towns would stop urban decay and end economic segregation of the suburbs." (p. xii) What was radical was the comprehensive scope of the enterprise, the creation of co-operative businesses to serve the community, and the fact that the federal government maintained ownership. This study ends with the implementation of Public Law 65 (1949) which transferred ownership of most of the houses to a private co-operative.
Walters, R. Eugenia. "Some Reminiscences of Miss R. Eugenia Walters." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 21 (May 1994): [6-10].
Bladey, Conrad Jay, and Helen Curtis. Human Adaptation to the Fall Line Setting: A Framework for the Archaeology of Laurel, Maryland. Laurel, MD: City of Laurel Archaeological Survey, 1983.