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Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Farrar, Hayward. "The Baltimore Afro-American's Crusade Against Racism in Employment, 1892-1950." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 6.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Cook, Eleanor M. V. "Georgetown: Jewel of Montgomery County-Part II." Montgomery County Story 42 (February 1999): 61-76.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Middletown." Frederick Magazine (May 1992): 12-14.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Tack, George E. "The Romantic Gwynn's Falls Valley." History Trails 26 (Autumn 1991-Winter 1991-92): 1-5.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of poet Tack's 1907 Maryland Monthly Magazine article describing the Valley, its businesses, its mills, its homes, etc., including the natural world. It ends with a poem by Folger McKinsey and one by Tack on the Valley.
Tack, George E. 100 Years, 1888-1988: The Daily Record. Baltimore: The Daily Record, 1988.
Hoffman, Ronald. "The Press in Mercantile Maryland: A Question of Utility." Journalism Quarterly 46 (1969): 536-544.
Colson, John Calvin. "The Fire Company Library Associations of Baltimore, 1838-1858." Journal of Library History, Philosophy and Comparative Librarianship 21 (Spring 1986): 158-76.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore's volunteer fire Companies had a soiled reputation, however, along with their misdeeds they established at least fifteen library associations. Little is actually known about these libraries and they did not outlast the fall of the volunteer companies. This article includes a useful chronology of Baltimore's libraries in a chart form.
Barlow, Marjorie Dana, comp. Notes on Woman Printers In Colonial America and the United States 1639-1975. New York: Hroswitha Club, 1976.
Beckles, Frances N. 20 Black Women: A Profile of Contemporary Black Maryland Women. Baltimore: Gateway Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Only set of biographical sketches currently available on African-American women in Maryland. These contemporary women have made significant contributions to a wide range of professions.
Beckles, Frances N. Three Quarters of a Century Plus Ten 1890-1975. Baltimore: Waverly Press and the Williams and Wilkins Co., 1975.
Annotation / Notes: History of the Williams and Wilkins publishing firm.
Hoffman, Ronald. "The Press in Mercantile Maryland: A Question of Utility." Journalism Quarterly, 46 (Autumn 1969): 536-44.