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Crowder, Ralph Leroy. John Edward Bruce and the Value of Knowing the Past: Politician, Journalist, and Self-Trained Historian of the African Diaspora, 1856-1924. Ph.D. diss., University of Kansas, 1994.
Wentworth, Jean. "Not Without Honor: William Lloyd Garrison." Maryland Historical Magazine 62 (1967): 318-336.
Anderson, Douglas. "The Textual Reproductions of Frederick Douglass." Clio 27 (Fall 1998): 57-87.
Ballard, Barbara Jean. Nineteenth-Century Theories of Race, the Concept of Correspondences, and the Images of Blacks in the Anti-slavery Writings of Douglass, Stow, and Browne. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1992.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. Family Resemblances: Zora Neale Hurston's Anthropological Heritage. Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1997.
Bedini, Silvio A. The Life of Benjamin Banneker: The First African-American Man of Science. Rev. ed. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1999.
Blassingame, John W., and John R. McKivigan, eds. Series one, vol. 4. The Frederick Douglass Papers: Speeches, Debates and Interviews, 1864-80. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1991.
Blassingame, John W., and John R. McKivigan, eds. Series one, vol. 5. The Frederick Douglass Papers: Speeches, Debates, and Interviews. 1881-95. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1992.
Blight, David W. "Up from 'Twoness:' Frederick Douglass and the Meaning of W. E. B. Dubois's Concept of Double Consciousness." Canadian Review of American Studies 21 (Winter 1990): 301-19.
Bolling, Carolyn Rae. An Intergenerational Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in the African-American Community: An Analysis of the Autobiographies of Olaudah Equiano, Harriet A. Jacobs, Zora Neale Hurston, and Langston Hughes. Ph.D. diss., Temple University, 1997.
Bordelon, Pam. "New Tracks on Dust Tracks: Toward a Reassessment of the Life of Zora Neale Hurston." African American Review 31 (Spring 1997): 5-21.
Boxill, Bernard R. "Fear and Shame as Forms of Moral Suasion in the Thought of Frederick Douglass." Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 31 (Fall 1995): 713-44.
Brock, W. R. "Race and the American Past: a Revolution in Historiography." History [Great Britain] 52 (1967): 49-59.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Carson, Warren Jason, Jr. Zora Neale Hurston: The Early Years, 1921-1934. Ph.D. diss., University of South Carolina, 1998.
Chinn, Nancy, and Elizabeth E. Dunn. "'The Ring of Singing Metal on Wood:' Zora Neale Hurston's Artistry in 'The Gilded Six-Bits.'" Mississippi Quarterly 49 (Fall 1996): 775-90.
Contee, Clarence G. The American Negro as Portrayed by the Baltimore Sun: 1901-1904. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1953.
Cornish, Sam. 1935: A Memoir. Boston: Ploughshares Books, 1990.
Farrar, Hayward. "The Baltimore Afro-American's Crusade Against Racism in Employment, 1892-1950." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 6.
Farrar, Hayward. See What the Afro Says: The Baltimore Afro-American. Ph.D. diss., University of Chicago, 1983.
Federal Writers Project. Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States, From Interviews With Former Slaves. 17 vols. St. Clair Shores, MI: Scholarly Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Volume 15 includes Marylanders.
Fehrenbacker, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Most important case of Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from Maryland.
Fly, Everrett L., and La Barbara Wigfall Fly. Northeastern, Montgomery County Black Oral History Study. Rockville, MD: Montgomery County Department of Housing and Community Development, 1983.
Foner, Philip S. "Address of Frederick Douglass at the Inauguration of Douglass Institute, Baltimore, October 1, 1865." Journal of Negro History 54 (1969): 174-183.