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Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Adamstown." Frederick Magazine (May 1993): 14-5.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Crossroads: Lewistown." Frederick Magazine (April 1990): 11-12.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Middletown." Historical Society of Frederick County Journal [3] (Summer 1994): 7-9.
Garrett, Jerre. Muffled Drums and Mustard Spoons: Cecil County, Maryland, 1860-1865. Shippensburg, PA: White Mane Publishing, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: As the author clearly states this is "a collection of all the things that grabbed my attention" as she researched Cecil during the Civil War years. It is largely arranged by year. Included in the appendix are 18 pages of Civil War letters.
George, Christopher T. "Harford County in the War of 1812." Harford Historical Bulletin 76 (Spring 1998): 3-61.
George, Christopher T. "Hyattstown, Maryland: Time and Place Preserved." The Preservationist 3 (January/February 1988): 4-5.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "'What If' and Gibson's Island." Anne Arundel County History Notes 21 (April 1990): 7.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "Portland: One of Anne Arundel's Vanished Villages." Anne Arundel County History Notes 22 (January 1991): 7-8.
Kelly, Jacques. Anne Arundel County: A Pictorial History. Norfolk, VA: Donning Company, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: Kelly, a leader of Maryland's photohistory genre, divides the County into five regions -- Glen Burnie, Severna Park, Annapolis, South Count, and Fort Meade and Oddnton. He also includes a chapter on transportation.
Kraus, Walter L. "Belle Chance at Andrews Air Force Base: A Piece of Maryland's Past." Maryland Historical Magazine 83 (Fall 1988): 268-73.
Annotation / Notes: Kraus argues that Andrews has the most historic setting of any airforce base in the country. He then goes on to discuss the history of the ownership of the land and the history of Belle Chance, a house on base.
Martin, Percy E. "Sam Arnold and Hookstown." History Trails 16 (Summer 1982): 13-16.
Annotation / Notes: One of the co-conspirators in the Lincoln assassination.
O'Malley, Catherine L. Odenton: The Town a Railroad Built. Annapolis and St. Michaels, MD: Published by the author, 1978.
O'Malley, Catherine L. Praising the Bridge that Brought them Over: One Hundred Years at Indian Head. Indian Head, MD: Naval Ordnance Station, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: The history of the military base, and its surrounding community, as told through photographs and excerpts with interviews from twenty-six individuals. A ten page time line charts events of importance among the Navy at Indian Head, in the town of Indian Head, and national and internationally.
Pruzan, Jeffrey S. "Shadows of Civil War Baltimore." Civil War Times Illustrated 35 (September/October 1995): 24-27, 69-72.
Schildt, John W. "Custer Rested and Dined in Smithsburg on Sunday, July 5, 1863." Cracker Barrel 18 (August 1988): 9.
Smart, Jeffery K. "Burning Bridges: The Events Leading Up to the Military Occupation of Harford County in 1861." Harford Historical Bulletin 72 (Spring 1997): 9-56.
Smart, Jeffery K. "From Plowshare to Sword: Historical Highlights of Gunpowder Neck and Edgewood Arsenal to the End of World War I." Harford Historical Bulletin 63 (Winter 1995): 3-49.
Strain, Paula M. The Blue Hills of Maryland: History Along the Appalachian Trail on South Mountain and the Catoctins. Vienna, VA: Potomac Appalachian Trail Club, 1993.
Annotation / Notes: Strain states that the Maryland portion of the Appalachian Trail has more history than any other part of the path. She presents this history as one would encounter it along the trail, heading north from Harpers Ferry to Pennsylvania. A great deal of this history relates to the Civil War. She also tells the history of the Trail itself.
Tidwell, William A. "Charles County: Confederate Cauldron." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Spring 1996): 16-27.
Annotation / Notes: Although largely rural and poorly populated, Charles County played an important role during the Civil War. A very large number of its citizens were actively involved in Confederate activities to the point where Charles County could be seen as a Confederate underground. The most well known related event was John Wilkes Booth's escape attempt through the County.
Warren, Morris. "Help Me Find Birmingham Manor." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 19 (April 1991): 18-19.
White, Roger. "Admiral: One of Anne Arundel's Vanished Villages." Anne Arundel County History Notes 24 (July 1993): 5-6, 9-11.
Abel, E. Lawrence. Singing the New Nation: How Music Shaped the Confederacy, 1861-1865. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: An in-depth look at every aspect of music during the Civil War, as it pertains to the southern cause. Although not focused on any particular state, there are important Maryland connections, for example the background and impact of "Maryland, My Maryland!" Cultural and political context are this author's strong suits, as he describes band music, songs of the common soldiers, parlor music of the day, and theatrical offerings.