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Birch, Alison Wyrley. "The Lady Was a General." Maryland 12 (Autumn 1979): 7-11.
Annotation / Notes: Anna Ella Carroll (1815-1893) was the daughter of a governor of Maryland whose own political career was an exception to the secondary role of most 19th century women in national affairs. In the 1850s and 1860s, Carroll wrote political tracts and advised political leaders in the Know Nothing and Republican parties. She also contributed to Union military strategy during the Civil War, corresponding with Abraham Lincoln and others in Washington.
Coryell, Janet L. Neither Heroine Nor Fool: Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1986.
Forman, William H., Jr. "William P. Harper in War and Reconstruction." Louisiana History 13 (1972): 47-70.
Gallien, Jeanie M. "James Calvert Wise: Soldier and Politician." Louisiana Studies 7 (1968): 347-377.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Martin, Percy E. "Sam Arnold and Hookstown." History Trails 16 (Summer 1982): 13-16.
Annotation / Notes: One of the co-conspirators in the Lincoln assassination.
Smart, Jeffery K. "Burning Bridges: The Events Leading Up to the Military Occupation of Harford County in 1861." Harford Historical Bulletin 72 (Spring 1997): 9-56.
Copeland, David. "'Join or Die:' America's Newspapers in the French and Indian War." Journalism History 24 (Autumn 1998): 112-21.
Brunk, Gerald R., and James O. Lehman. A Guide to Select Revolutionary War Records Pertaining to Mennonites and Other Pacifist Groups in Southeastern Pennsylvania and Maryland, 1775-1800. N.p., 1974.
Hollowak, Thomas L. "Maryland Genealogy and Family History: A Bibliography, 1987-1989." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 33 (Summer 1992): 484-530.
Radoff, Morris L. "The Maryland Records in the Revolutionary War." American Archivist 37 (April 1974): 277-85.
Annotation / Notes: Governmental records are always at risk during times of war. Maryland's records were in an even more precarious position during the Revolutionary War, the Maryland State House was under construction. Radoff discusses the movement of Maryland's records in attempts to keep them safe from harm. Also discussed in the theft of Cecil County land records by British troops.
Crowl, Philip A. "Maryland during and after the Revolution: A Political and Economic Study." Johns Hopkins University Studies 61 (1943).
Gienapp, William E. "Abraham Lincoln and the Border States." Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association 13 (1992): 13-46.
Annotation / Notes: An analysis of Lincoln's policies in the border states, Maryland, Kentucky and Missouri, designed to prevent secession. After 1861, when each border state had pledged Union allegiance, Gienapp explores Lincoln's successes and failures in preserving or establishing loyal governments in each border state, fostering loyalty among its citizens, minimizing military occupation of these states, and ending slavery by voluntary state action.
Hickey, Donald R. The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: A comprehensive examination of the political background, military operations, and diplomatic closure of "Mr. Madison's War." It may have been forgotten in other areas, but for Maryland the War of 1812 was all too real. The Royal Navy roamed the Chesapeake with impunity, occupied Tangier Island, burned Frenchtown, attacked St. Michaels and Havre de Grace, sacked the nation's capitol after defeating the militia at Bladensburg, before meeting defeat after a combined sea-land attack on Baltimore City, which was immortalized in Francis Scott Key's "Star Spangled Banner." There is also a chapter on the infamous Baltimore riot of 1812.
Lee, Jean B. The Price of Nationhood: The American Revolution in Charles County. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1994.
Annotation / Notes: This intensive and insightful study of a single county offers insight into several large themes in Maryland history - "the American Revolution as a transforming, ongoing phenomenon, civilian's responses to the War for Independence, the tenor of the nation's formative years, and the nature of Chesapeake society." During this period Charles Country changed from prosperous economy, securely connected to the outside world through overseas trade, into a stagnant backwater, whose forward looking population searched for opportunity elsewhere. Unlike other areas of Maryland, where the Revolutionary years were tumultuous, there were few challenges to the status quo. Cut off from the empire, entrepreneurial whites left the county in search of wealth and opportunity, often as close as Washington, DC, and the population became overwhelmingly unfree.
Wagandt, Charles L. "Election by Sword and Ballot: the Emancipationist Victory of 1863." Maryland Historical Magazine 59 (1964): 143-164.
Walker, Paul Kent. The Baltimore Community and the American Revolution: A Study in Urban Development, 1763-1783. Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1973.
Cole, Merle T. "Racing Real Estate, and Realpolitik: The Havre De Grace State Military Reservation." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Fall 1996): 328-46.
Sherman, Colonel Philip. "The Engaging Mrs. E." Generations 5 (June 1984): 3-17.
Annotation / Notes: Mrs. Shinah Solomon Etting.
Trindal, Elizabeth Steger. Mary Surratt: An American Tragedy. Gretna, LA: Pelican Publishing Company, Inc., 1996.
Aldrich, Duncan M. "Frontier Militias: Militia Laws on the North American and South African Frontiers." In The Frontier: Comparative Studies, Vol. 2. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979.
Coryell, Janet L. Neither Heroine nor Fool: Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland. Kent, OH: Kent State University Press, 1990.
Dunning, Charles Mark. Regulating Chesapeake Bay: An Inquiry into the Use of Federal Regulation to Control the Private Use of a Publicly Owned Natural Resource. Ph.D. diss., Washington University, 1984.