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Love, Mary I. "'The Mountain Chautauqua': Mountain Lake Park 1881-1941." Glades Star 5 (March 1982): 385-401; (September 1982): 434-35.
Merrill, Philip J., and Uluaipou-O-Malo Aiono. Baltimore. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Part of Arcadia's Black America Series, this photohistory, which uses a variety of graphic materials, gives a visual introduction to Baltimore as documented through the lives of its black citizens. Many of the photographs are the work of black photographers.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Riley, Elihu S. "St. Mary's County Adopts an Official Song." Chronicles of St. Mary's 35 (Winter 1987): 72-73.
Abel, E. Lawrence. Singing the New Nation: How Music Shaped the Confederacy, 1861-1865. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: An in-depth look at every aspect of music during the Civil War, as it pertains to the southern cause. Although not focused on any particular state, there are important Maryland connections, for example the background and impact of "Maryland, My Maryland!" Cultural and political context are this author's strong suits, as he describes band music, songs of the common soldiers, parlor music of the day, and theatrical offerings.
Alexander, Douglas, II. "Stendhal and Violence on the Baltimore Stage." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 68-72.
Archer, Stephen M. Junius Brutus Booth. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.
Baker, Mary Lou. "The Annapolis Symphony: An Orchestra with Pizzazz!" Maryland 26 (November/December 1994): 38-43.
Barnett, David. "'Maryland,' The Movie." Maryland 21 (Spring 1989): 69.
Bartel, Dennis. "Knabe Pianos...For Genteel People of Means." Maryland 24 (Spring 1992): 42-47.
Categories: Music and Theater
Benson, Norman Arthur. The Itinerant Dancing and Music Masters of Eighteenth-Century America. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1963.
Bernard, Kenneth A. "Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War." Lincoln Herald 66 (1964): 115-134.
Black, Mary Childs. The Theatre in Colonial Annapolis. M.A. thesis, George Washington University, 1952.
Black, Mary Childs. "BMI is 'Making Music' All Summer Long." Nuts and Bolts 12 (Summer 1994): 1.
Categories: Music and Theater
Bond, Chrystelle T. "A Chronicle of Dance in Baltimore, 1780-1814." Dance Perspectives 66, vol. 17 (Summer 1976).
Annotation / Notes: A summary of dancing, both ballroom and theatre, in Baltimore during an important 34-year period, with a focus on dancemasters William Francis (active at Holliday Street theatre 1794-1826) and Pierre Landrin Duport (active in Baltimore 1791-2, 1802-10), as well as musician Alexandria Reinagle and stage dancer John Durang and his descendents. Bond focuses on themes like patriotism and exoticism (through pantomime and French ballet), showing how choreographed upper class dances of the colonial period (like the minuet) gradually gave way to the simple, more commercial dances for the middle classes. This is an essential study for music, theatre and dance historians.
Breslaw, Elaine G. "An Early Maryland Musical Society." Maryland Historical Magazine 67 (1972): 436-37.
Breslaw, Elaine G. Records of the Tuesday Club of Annapolis, 1745-56. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: Companion volume to Talley, Secular Music in Colonial Annapolis.
Brunner, Raymond J. "Baltimore Organs and Organbuilding in the Nineteenth Century." Tracker 35, no. 2 (1991): 12.
Annotation / Notes: Well organized and appropriately illustrated, Brunner first summarizes organ-building in Baltimore up to 1850. He then focuses on specific builders James Hall, Henry Berger, August Pomplitz, Charles Strohl, Heilner & Schumacher, Henry Niemann, Adam Stein, and George Barker's Baltimore Organ Co. Drawing on earlier published works by Thomas Eader and John Speller and Orpha Ochse, Brunner's article reveals the competitive sprit felt among various Baltimore congregations, and also the status of this craft in relation to other Eastern seaboard cities.
Carney, Benjamin Franklin. The Baltimore Theatre Project, 1971-1983: Toward a People's Theatre. Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri, 1985.
Chidsey, Martha Ann. The West Street Theatre, Annapolis, Maryland: 1771-74. M.A. thesis, American University, 1977.
Chowning, Larry S. "The Show Boat." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 17 (June 1987): 62-66.
Categories: Music and Theater
Cissel, Anne W. "Public Houses of Entertainment and their Proprietors, 1750-1828." Montgomery County Story 30 (August 1987): 279-94.
Clarke, Donald. Wishing on the Moon: The Life and Times of Billie Holiday. New York: Viking Penguin, 1994.
Click, Patricia C. The Spirit of the Times: Amusements in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This author expertly interweaves a detailed description of work habits, living arrangements, economics, and class structure with the question of what people did for fun. Around 1800 a variety of public entertainments included music, drama, presentational dancing, feats of dexterity and other spectacular offerings -these were held at theatres, circuses, taverns, and pleasure gardens. As the century progressed amusements became increasingly specialized and stratified, serving people of differing economic means, political leanings, and ethnic/religious backgrounds.
Cohen, Maxine. "The Front Street Theater Fire of 1895." Generations (Fall 1993): 9-16, 27.