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Adler, Larry. It Ain't Necessarily So. New York: Grove Press, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: Autobiography of a Baltimore-born musician.
Schaaf, Elizabeth. "George Peabody: His Life and Legacy, 1795-1869." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 268-85.
Annotation / Notes: George Peabody's legacy to Baltimore transcends the music conservatory and magnificent library that bear his name. His gifts influenced other wealthy friends whose philanthropy help establish some of the great educational and cultural institutions that grace the city: the Johns Hopkins University, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Walters Art Gallery. This article surveys the life of a man admired and respected on both sides of the Atlantic.
Dudley, David. "James Hubert 'Eubie' Blake." Baltimore 92 (March 1999): 38-39.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Merrill, Philip J., and Uluaipou-O-Malo Aiono. Baltimore. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Part of Arcadia's Black America Series, this photohistory, which uses a variety of graphic materials, gives a visual introduction to Baltimore as documented through the lives of its black citizens. Many of the photographs are the work of black photographers.
Bond, Chrystelle T. "A Chronicle of Dance in Baltimore, 1780-1814." Dance Perspectives 66, vol. 17 (Summer 1976).
Annotation / Notes: A summary of dancing, both ballroom and theatre, in Baltimore during an important 34-year period, with a focus on dancemasters William Francis (active at Holliday Street theatre 1794-1826) and Pierre Landrin Duport (active in Baltimore 1791-2, 1802-10), as well as musician Alexandria Reinagle and stage dancer John Durang and his descendents. Bond focuses on themes like patriotism and exoticism (through pantomime and French ballet), showing how choreographed upper class dances of the colonial period (like the minuet) gradually gave way to the simple, more commercial dances for the middle classes. This is an essential study for music, theatre and dance historians.
Brunner, Raymond J. "Baltimore Organs and Organbuilding in the Nineteenth Century." Tracker 35, no. 2 (1991): 12.
Annotation / Notes: Well organized and appropriately illustrated, Brunner first summarizes organ-building in Baltimore up to 1850. He then focuses on specific builders James Hall, Henry Berger, August Pomplitz, Charles Strohl, Heilner & Schumacher, Henry Niemann, Adam Stein, and George Barker's Baltimore Organ Co. Drawing on earlier published works by Thomas Eader and John Speller and Orpha Ochse, Brunner's article reveals the competitive sprit felt among various Baltimore congregations, and also the status of this craft in relation to other Eastern seaboard cities.
Click, Patricia C. The Spirit of the Times: Amusements in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This author expertly interweaves a detailed description of work habits, living arrangements, economics, and class structure with the question of what people did for fun. Around 1800 a variety of public entertainments included music, drama, presentational dancing, feats of dexterity and other spectacular offerings -these were held at theatres, circuses, taverns, and pleasure gardens. As the century progressed amusements became increasingly specialized and stratified, serving people of differing economic means, political leanings, and ethnic/religious backgrounds.
Dormon, James H. Theater in the Ante Bellum South, 1815-1861. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.
Eader, Thomas S. "Baltimore Organs and Organ Building." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (1970): 263-282.
Fisher, James Long. The Origin and Development of Public School Music in Baltimore to 1870. Ed.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1970.
Haims, Lynn. "First American Theatre Contracts: Wall and Lindsay's Maryland Company of Comedians, and the Annapolis, Fell's Point, and Baltimore Theatres, 1781-1783." Theatre Survey 17 (November 1976): 179-94.
Hodes, Michael C. "From Towson to Broadway." Maryland 28 (March 1996): 18-23.
Kares, M. "Baltimore: Center of German-American Organ Building." Tracker 39, no. 3 (1995): 10-17.
Keefer, Lubov. Baltimore's Music: The Haven of the American Composer. Baltimore: J. H. Furst Co., 1962.
Annotation / Notes: As eccentric as its author, the incomparable Lubov Breit Keefer, Baltimore's Music is a dizzying stream of consciousness that rushed from Colonial Maryland headlong into the 'sixties. Keefer covers everything from church music to tin pan alley, packing in histories of all of the city's major musical organizations, amateur and professional, along with glimpses of composers, performers and musical trends. It helps to remember that no on else had the nerve to take on this topic. Keefer did, publishing it herself, without the benefit of an editor, and this is all we have to date.
Koenig, Linda Lee. The Vagabonds, America's Oldest Little Theater. Rutherford, NJ: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1983.
Kraus, Joanna Halpert. A History of the Children's Theatre Association of Baltimore, Maryland >From 1943-1966. Ed.D. diss., Columbia University, 1972.
Myers, J., and C. Kennedy. "The Last Words: Baltimore Multiculturalism...and furthermore." Sing Out 38 (May/June/July 1993): 134-35.
Pennell, Nancy Kay. The First Theatres of Baltimore: An Investigation of Baltimore's Theatres During the Age of the Early American Republic. Ph.D. diss., University of Kansas, 1998.
Preston, Katherine K. Opera on the Road: Traveling Opera Troupes in the United States, 1825-60. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1993.
Ritchey, David. "The Baltimore Theater and the Yellow Fever Epidemic." Maryland Historical Magazine 67 (1972): 298-301.
Ritchey, David. "Baltimore's Eighteenth-Century French Theatre." Southern Speech Communication Journal 38 (1972): 164-167.
Ritchey, David. "Columbia Garden: Baltimore's First Pleasure Garden." Southern Speech Communication Journal 39 (1974): 241-247.
Ritchey, David, comp., and ed. A Guide to the Baltimore Stage in the Eighteenth Century: A History and Day Book Calendar. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1982.
Ritchey, David. "The Philadelphia Company Performs in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 71 (Spring 1976): 80-85.