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Blakey, Arch Frederick. General John H. Winder, C.S.A. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1990.
Cameron, Roldah N. "Levi Oldham Cameron: Cecil County Builder & Politician." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 67 (April 1994): 4-5.
Cameron, Roldah N. "Cecil Minister Had to Pick Two for Execution in Civil War." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 54 (May 1987): 1-3.
Chidester, Karen, and Elly Williamson. "Mister Creswell's Chairs." Bulletin of The Historical Society of Cecil County 79 (Autumn 1998): 8-10.
Coryell, Janet L. Neither Heroine Nor Fool: Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1986.
Harris, Richard E. "Blacks of Maryland's Caroline County Thrive Throughout the Slavery Period." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 8 (Winter 1987): 157-60.
Klein, Mary O. "'We Shall Be Accountable to God:' Some Inquiries into the Position of Blacks in Somerset Parish, Maryland, 1692-1865." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Winter 1992): 399-406.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the conversion of free blacks and slaves in Somerset Parish. While a 1664 Maryland law stated that baptism had no effect on the status of a slave, the Anglican church worked towards conversion of the enslaved. However, Christian education and baptism varied depending on individual slaveowners. In some cases, the enslaved themselves refused to be baptized. Evidence of African religious practices remained alongside the practice of Christianity.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Wennersten, John R. "A Cycle of Race Relations on Maryland's Eastern Shore: Somerset County, 1850-1917." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Winter 1985): 377-382.
Wennersten, John R., and Ruth Ellen Wennersten. "Separate and Unequal: The Evolution of a Black Land Grant College in Maryland, 1890-1930." Maryland Historical Magazine 72 (Spring 1977): 110-17.
Annotation / Notes: The authors examine how Princess Anne Academy on the lower Eastern Shore of Maryland developed after 1890 as a state and federally supported land grant school. Like other land grant schools, Princess Anne Academy was neglected by state and federal agencies. This academy was an example of separate education provided for blacks which demonstrated how land grant schools were indeed separate ad unequal.
Wilson, Emily Wanda. The Public Education of Negroes on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Harris, Walter G. "The 1884 Kent County Jail." Old Kent 4 (March 1988): 1-2.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Browne, Gary L. Cecil County Maryland 1608-1850 As Seen By Some Visitors and Several Essays on Local History Collected by G.E. Gifford, Jr. Rising Sun, MD: George E. Gifford Memorial Committee, Calvert School, 1974.
Jopp, Harold D. Rediscovery of the Eastern Shore: Delmarva Travelogues of the 1870s. Wye Mills, MD: Chesapeake College Press, 1986.
Annotation / Notes: Reprints of articles by four different authors which appeared in the leading nineteenth century publications of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Lippincott's Magazine, and Scribner's Monthly. The authors included noted illustrator Howard Pyle and Maryland writer George Townsend.
Jopp, Harold D. "The Maryland Directory: A Look at Cecil's Communities in 1882." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 62 (September 1992): 9-11; 64 (April 1993): 8-9.
Jopp, Harold D. "The Maryland Directory: A Look at Cecil's Communities in 1882." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 66 (December 1993): 4-5; 67 (April 1994): 6-7.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Robbins, Geoffrey H., and Brian P. Henley, eds. A Century of Seashore Hospitality: The History of Ocean City, MD, 1875-1975. Ocean City, MD: Ocean City Bicentennial Committee, 1975.
Varner, Lynne K. "The Forgotten Town of Oriole." Maryland 23 (Summer 1991): 20-25.
Annotation / Notes: Oriole was once a prosperous Methodist black community whose inhabitants were farmers and watermen. The few remaining residents of Oriole are hoping to revitalize the community through the preservation of St. James Church, once a cornerstone of the community.
Dugan, Mary L. "Mute Inglorious Milton." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 74 (Autumn 1996): 1, 5-6.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Democracy's Incursion into the Eastern Shore: The 1870 Election in Chestertown." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 338-46.