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Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Peasant Priorities?: Tidewater Blacks and the Land in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Locus 3 (Fall 1990): 21-45.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Planters, Apprenticeship, and Forced Labor: The Black Family Under Pressure in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Agricultural History 62 (Fall 1988): 57-74.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "A Reform Mentality: Federal Policy toward Black Marylanders, 1864-1868." Civil War History 22 (September 1976): 214-35.
Garonzik, Joseph. Urbanization and the Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1870. Ph.D. diss., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1974.
Goldin, Claudia Dale. Urban Slavery in the American South 1820-1860: A Quantitative History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Numerous references to Baltimore.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Groves, Paul A., and Edward K. Muller. "The Evolution of Black Residential Areas in Late Nineteenth-Century Cities." Journal of Historical Geography 1 (April 1975): 169-91.
Annotation / Notes: Includes Baltimore.
Gwillim, Joy. "Slavery in Cecil County." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 68 (September 1994): 5-6.
Harris, Richard E. "Blacks of Maryland's Caroline County Thrive Throughout the Slavery Period." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 8 (Winter 1987): 157-60.
Hicks, Helena S. The Black Apprentice in Maryland Court Records from 1661 to 1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the apprenticeship system in Maryland as related to blacks during the period 1661 to 1865. For blacks in Maryland, apprenticeship was one of the earliest forms of education available. Court records are used to examine Maryland's apprenticeship system. Although Maryland's apprenticeship law of 1793 eliminated the reading and writing requirement for apprentices in the case of black apprentices, black apprentices' contracts still contained literacy provisions. Employment in various trade was another benefit resulting from the apprenticeship system.
Kulikoff, Allan. "Black Society and the Economics of Slavery." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Summer 1975): 203-10.
Annotation / Notes: Review Essay.
Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1986.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. "Slave Families at Early Chesapeake Ironworks." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 86 (April 1978): 169-79.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the self-determination on the part of blacks enslaved as ironworkers in order to counter the view of the fragmented black family as espoused by scholars such as E. Franklin Frazier and Daniel P. Moynihan. The author examines such Maryland ironworks as Northampton Furnace and Patuxent Iron Works. Ironworkers were provided opportunities for "overwork" - that is, working overtime in return for cash or supplies. The money allowed ironworkers and their families an improved standard of living. In addition, ironworkers did not experience strict controls over their free time, home life, or leisure activities. These factors, the author feels, contributed to a stable family structure among enslaved ironworkers.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. Slavery in the Chesapeake Iron Industry, 1716-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Akron, 1974.
Lindsay, Isabel B. Participation of Negroes in the Establishment of Welfare Services 1865-1900 with special reference to District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia. Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1952.
McElvey, Kay Najiyyah. Early Black Dorchester, 1776-1870: A History of the Struggle of African-Americans in Dorchester County, Maryland, to be Free to Make Their Own Choices. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines selected events relating to Dorchester County's black population between 1776 and 1870 and their struggle to make their own political, economic, religious, and educational choices. The author also focuses on the enslaved and free leaders who led the fight for self-determination. The author hopes that her text will be used in high school classrooms as a local history of black Dorchester County.
Marks, Bayly E. "Skilled Blacks in Antebellum St. Mary's County, Maryland." Journal of Southern History 53 (November 1987): 537-64.
May, Patrick Joseph. The Residential Change of the Free Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, College Park, 1999.
Menard, Russell R. "From Servants to Slaves: The Transformation of the Chesapeake Labor System." Southern Studies 16 (Winter 1977): 355-90.
Mullins, Paul R. The Contradictions of Consumption: An Archaeology of African America and Consumer Culture, 1850-1930. Ph.D. diss., University of Massachusetts, 1996.
Mullins, Paul R. "Race and the Genteel Consumer: Class and African-American Consumption, 1850-1930." Historical Archaeology 33, no. 1 (1999): 22-38.
Murphy, Thomas Richard. 'Negroes of Ours:' Jesuit Slaveholding in Maryland, 1717-1838. Ph.D. diss., University of Connecticut, 1998.
Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia. "Black Housing Patterns in Baltimore City, 1885 - 1953." The Maryland Historian 16 (Spring/Summer 1985): 25-39.
Phillips, Christopher William. 'Negroes and Other Slaves:' The African-American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1992.