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Carmichael, Edmund C. The Pacas of Maryland and Their "Relatives." [Belhaven, NC]: E. C. Paca, 1994.
Crook, Mary Charlotte. "The Two Avenel Farms and the Rapley Family." Montgomery County Story 39 (May 1996): 381-91.
Dorsey, James. "Faithful Mammy and Family of J. A. Hunter." Harford Historical Bulletin 46 (Autumn 1990): 75-77.
Dozzi, Victor D. "Dr. John Fullmer." Glades Star 6 (September 1989): 336-38.
Eff, Elaine. "Now Coming to Light: Oral Histories of Chesapeake Lighthouse Keepers and Kin." In Context 3 (Spring 1994): 8.
Fenwick, LaVerne M. "The Hebbs of St. Mary's County, Maryland." Chronicles of St. Mary's 39 (Spring 1991): 1-15.
Ferguson, Ann M. "Heritage of Another Riversdale Family." Riverdale Town Crier 26 (March 1997): 3.
Gatewood, Gloria V. "An Introduction to the Smith Family of Port Republic, Calvert County." Calvert Historian 7 (Fall 1992): 8-11.
Heller, Janet. "Saving Baltimore History and Keeping It in the Family." Historic Preservation News 33 (February 1993): 10-13.
Kelley, Hailey. "Fame in My Family." Glades Star 8 (March 1997): 166, 179.
White, Roger. "The Jones Family of Odenton: A Railroading Tradition." Anne Arundel County History Notes 22 (January 1991): 1, 10-13, 16.
Arpee, Marion. "Maryland Slaves in Hardey Wills and Indentures: 1718-1805." Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 22 (Winter 1981): 24-27.
Clayton, Ralph. Black Baltimore, 1820-1870. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1988.
Clayton, Ralph. Free Blacks of Anne Arundel County, Maryland. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1987.
Clayton, Ralph. Slavery, Slaveholding and the Free Black Population of Antebellum Baltimore. Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Diedrich, Maria. Love Across Color Lines: Ottilie Assing and Frederick Douglass. New York: Hill & Wang, 1999.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Harrold, Stanley. "Freeing the Weems Family: A New Look at the Underground Railroad." Civil War History 42 (December 1996): 289-306.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines conventional and scholarly interpretations of underground railroad by looking at the escape of the Weems family from the Chesapeake region of Maryland. By using the Weems family as a case study, the author challenges thirty years' worth of scholarship on the underground railroad. By examining a family that escaped from a border state, the author is able to explore both black self-determination and white assistance found in the records of this family's escape. In addition, the author examines a bi-racial network of non-Garrisonian abolitionists who raised money to purchase the freedom of slaves, or if that was not possible, to channel the money raised into effecting an escape plan.
Harris, Richard E. "Blacks of Maryland's Caroline County Thrive Throughout the Slavery Period." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 8 (Winter 1987): 157-60.
Heinegg, Paul. Free African Americans of Maryland and Delaware: From the Colonial Period to 1810. Baltimore: Clearfield, 2000.
Ives, Sallie M. "The Formation of a Black Community in Annapolis, 1870-1885." Geographical Perspectives on Maryland's Past." Edited by Robert D. Mitchell and Edward K. Muller, 129-49. College Park, MD: University of Maryland Department of Geography, 1979.
Jacob, Grace Hill. The Negro in Baltimore, 1860-1900. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1945.
Klingelhofer, Eric. "Aspects of Early African-American Material Culture: Artifacts from the Slave Quarters at Garrison Plantation, Maryland." Historical Archaeology 21 (1987): 112-19.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the objects excavated from the slave quarters at Garrison Plantation near Baltimore, Maryland. Various groups of objects represented early black material culture which reveal aspects of Africanisms. Archaeology is particularly useful for the study of Africanisms found in material culture as patterns of found objects may be compared chronologically and geographically.
Morrow, Diane Batts. The Oblate Sisters of Providence: Issues of Black and Female Agency in their Antebellum Experience, 1828-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1996.