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Middleton, Authur Pierce. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. Newport News, VA: Mariners Museum, 1953.
Dodds, Richard. "Ross Winans and His Amazing Cigar Ship." Weather Gauge 25 (Fall 1989): 5-7.
Eff, Elaine. "Now Coming to Light: Oral Histories of Chesapeake Lighthouse Keepers and Kin." In Context 3 (Spring 1994): 8.
Frye, John. "Back from Disaster." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 19 (December 1989): 48-50.
Annotation / Notes: Joshua Slocum.
Gilje, Paul A. "A Sailor Prisoner of War During the War of 1812." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Spring 1990): 58-72.
Norton, Louis Arthur. Joshua Barney, Hero of the Revolution and 1812. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: Joshua Barney (1758-1818) was a naval hero in both the American Revolution and the War of 1812. Aside from his military exploits, this patriotic Marylander's life is closely associated with the history of the American flag. Barney is best known for the spirited action of the barge men under his command at the Battle of Bladensburg in 1814. Alone among the Americans at the battle, Barney and his men fought bravely against a superior British force.
Plummer, Norman H. "Lieutenant John Trippe: The Last Chapter." Weather Gauge 30 (Spring 1994): 21-27.
Abingbade, Harrison Ola. "The Settler-African Conflicts: The Case of the Maryland Colonists and the Grebo 1840-1900." Journal of Negro History 66 (Summer 1981): 93-109.
Slezak, Eva, comp. "Blacks Employed in Maritime Related Occupations: Wood's Baltimore City Directory, 1871." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 11 (Winter 1990): 169-85.
Trivelli, Marifrances. "'I Knew a Ship from Stem to Stern:' The Maritime World of Frederick Douglass." Log of Mystic Seaport 46, no. 4 (1995): 98-108.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Dodds, Richard. Solomons Island and Vicinity: An Illustrated History and Walking Tour. Solomons, MD: Calvert Marine Museum, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of the Island, from its inhabitation by Native Americans to the late twentieth century. The author covers the folklore, traditions, and way of life of this unusual community. Poetry and phrases are also included. There is a discussion of the Island's future. The books is illustrated with images by noted Maryland photographers Marion Warren and Aubrey Bodine. A tour of Solomons Island, Avondale (Johnston), and the surrounding area. The sites chosen discuss the social and cultural history of the area.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Robinson, John M. "History of Pinehurst-Part I." Anne Arundel County History Notes 21 (January 1990): 3-4.
Smith, Bert. Greetings from Baltimore: Postcard Views of the City. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: The history of Baltimore as told through postcards, arranged by subject -- harbor, shopping downtown, monuments, etc. Each section is accompanied by several paragraphs of text. Also included is information on the postcards themselves, as well as on the collecting and history of postcards. Illustrations are excellent, slightly enlarged, and show off the medium.
Sword, Gerald J. "Acquisition of the Point Lookout Lighthouse Site by the United States Government from Jenifer Taylor." Chronicles of St. Mary's 26 (January 1978): 340-46.
Cox, Richard J. "Two Marylanders in the Early Navy: The Hambleton Family Papers, MS. 2021." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 317-21.
Garitee, Jerome R. The Republic's Private Navy: The American Privateering Business as Practiced Baltimore during the War of 1812. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, Published for Mystic Seaport, Inc., 1977.
Annotation / Notes: The British attack on Baltimore during the War of 1812 was motivated by a desire to punish the city for being a nest of republicans and privateers. This book traces in admirable detail the history of privateering - from the ships, outfitting, captains and crews, investors, their successes and failures, through the distribution of the prize money. While the pirates on the Spanish main may have been the dregs of the sea, Baltimore's privateers were underwritten by some of its leading mercantile and political leaders. The book includes useful appendices identifying the privateers, investors and proceeds.
Horton, Tom. An Island Out of Time: A Memoir of Smith Island in the Chesapeake. New York, W. W. Norton and Company, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: Horton's title suggests his principal themes in examining Smith Island life: that the islands represent a distinctive way of life rooted in another time whose preservation into the future may literally be running out of time. An environmental columnist for the Baltimore Sun who lived on Smith Island in the late 1980s as an environmental educator with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Horton examines the water-related economy, traditionally based on oystering and crabbing, and the unique way of life that evolved in the relative isolation of the island communities. His book profiles the personalities of Smith Island, the work of men and women, the pervasive role of religion in island life, and social, economic, and environmental changes threatening the island's future.
Brown, Alexander Crosby. The Old Bay Line, 1840-1940. New York: Bonanza, 1940.
Catton, William H. "How Rails Saved a Seaport." American Heritage 8 (1957): 26-31, 93-95.
Catton, William H. John W. Garrett of the Baltimore and Ohio: A Study in Seaport and Railroad Competition, 1820-1874. Ph.D. diss., Northwestern University, 1959.
Dohan, Mary Helen. Mr. Roosevelt's Steamboat; the First Steamboat to Travel the Mississippi. New York: Dodd, Mead, 1981.
Flexner, James Thomas. Steamboats Come True. Boston: Little, Brown, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Did James Rumsey really invent the steamboat with his famous voyage in the Potomac River off Shepherdstown, Virginia on December 3, 1787? No. This somewhat disorganized but invigorating rendition of the race to be the steamboat's inventor sets things straight.