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Delaplaine, Edward S. John Phillip Sousa and the National Anthem. Frederick, MD: Great Southern Press, 1983.
Otter, William. History of My Own Times or, the Life and Adventures of William Otter, Sen. Comprising a Series of Events, and Musical Incidents Altogether Original. Emmitsburg, MD: n.p., 1835; reprint. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: William Otter (1787-1856) has left an entertaining autobiography of his life as a plasterer and practical jokester. Originally published in Emmitsburg in 1835, Otter's History offers an unusual glimpse into social history from an artisan's perspective. Whether Otter's humorous adventures and anecdotes are all true is debatable. His story does, however, suggest a continuation of the irreverent Maryland personality seen in the works of Ebenezer Cooke, Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Meshack Browning.
Price, Walter W. "The Bashford Amphitheater's Name." Glades Star 6 (June 1990): 412-14.
Schaaf, Elizabeth. "George Peabody: His Life and Legacy, 1795-1869." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 268-85.
Annotation / Notes: George Peabody's legacy to Baltimore transcends the music conservatory and magnificent library that bear his name. His gifts influenced other wealthy friends whose philanthropy help establish some of the great educational and cultural institutions that grace the city: the Johns Hopkins University, the Enoch Pratt Free Library, and the Walters Art Gallery. This article surveys the life of a man admired and respected on both sides of the Atlantic.
David, Jonathan. "The Sermon and the Shout: A History of the Singing and Praying Bands of Maryland and Delaware." Southern Folklore Quarterly 51, no. 3 (1994): 241-63.
Beirne, Francis F. The Amiable Baltimoreans. New York, 1951; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A social history of Baltimore City told through thematic chapters. Chapter topics are varied and include a wide range of subjects: i.e. monuments, food, sports, Hopkins Hospital, newspapers, and politics.
Beirne, Francis F. Brunswick, 100 Years of Memories. Brunswick, MD: Brunswick-Potomac Foundation, Inc., 1990.
Annotation / Notes: As the preface clearly states this is not a "scholarly book", however, it is an interesting scrapbook of information on almost any imaginable subject relating to Brunswick. An encyclopedia of the compilers memories and their view of the history of the community. The source and writer of each entry is clearly identified. A chapter of distinguished citizens is included and three pages of songs.
Cross, E. May. "The Patent Medicine Show and Other Events at Rayville." History Trails 33 (Spring 1999): 9-12.
Love, Mary I. "'The Mountain Chautauqua': Mountain Lake Park 1881-1941." Glades Star 5 (March 1982): 385-401; (September 1982): 434-35.
Merrill, Philip J., and Uluaipou-O-Malo Aiono. Baltimore. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Part of Arcadia's Black America Series, this photohistory, which uses a variety of graphic materials, gives a visual introduction to Baltimore as documented through the lives of its black citizens. Many of the photographs are the work of black photographers.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Abel, E. Lawrence. Singing the New Nation: How Music Shaped the Confederacy, 1861-1865. Mechanicsburg, PA: Stackpole Books, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: An in-depth look at every aspect of music during the Civil War, as it pertains to the southern cause. Although not focused on any particular state, there are important Maryland connections, for example the background and impact of "Maryland, My Maryland!" Cultural and political context are this author's strong suits, as he describes band music, songs of the common soldiers, parlor music of the day, and theatrical offerings.
Archer, Stephen M. Junius Brutus Booth. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1992.
Bernard, Kenneth A. "Lincoln and the Music of the Civil War." Lincoln Herald 66 (1964): 115-134.
Bond, Chrystelle T. "A Chronicle of Dance in Baltimore, 1780-1814." Dance Perspectives 66, vol. 17 (Summer 1976).
Annotation / Notes: A summary of dancing, both ballroom and theatre, in Baltimore during an important 34-year period, with a focus on dancemasters William Francis (active at Holliday Street theatre 1794-1826) and Pierre Landrin Duport (active in Baltimore 1791-2, 1802-10), as well as musician Alexandria Reinagle and stage dancer John Durang and his descendents. Bond focuses on themes like patriotism and exoticism (through pantomime and French ballet), showing how choreographed upper class dances of the colonial period (like the minuet) gradually gave way to the simple, more commercial dances for the middle classes. This is an essential study for music, theatre and dance historians.
Brunner, Raymond J. "Baltimore Organs and Organbuilding in the Nineteenth Century." Tracker 35, no. 2 (1991): 12.
Annotation / Notes: Well organized and appropriately illustrated, Brunner first summarizes organ-building in Baltimore up to 1850. He then focuses on specific builders James Hall, Henry Berger, August Pomplitz, Charles Strohl, Heilner & Schumacher, Henry Niemann, Adam Stein, and George Barker's Baltimore Organ Co. Drawing on earlier published works by Thomas Eader and John Speller and Orpha Ochse, Brunner's article reveals the competitive sprit felt among various Baltimore congregations, and also the status of this craft in relation to other Eastern seaboard cities.
Cissel, Anne W. "Public Houses of Entertainment and their Proprietors, 1750-1828." Montgomery County Story 30 (August 1987): 279-94.
Click, Patricia C. The Spirit of the Times: Amusements in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This author expertly interweaves a detailed description of work habits, living arrangements, economics, and class structure with the question of what people did for fun. Around 1800 a variety of public entertainments included music, drama, presentational dancing, feats of dexterity and other spectacular offerings -these were held at theatres, circuses, taverns, and pleasure gardens. As the century progressed amusements became increasingly specialized and stratified, serving people of differing economic means, political leanings, and ethnic/religious backgrounds.
Dormon, James H. Theater in the Ante Bellum South, 1815-1861. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1967.
Eader, Thomas S. "Baltimore Organs and Organ Building." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (1970): 263-282.
Fisher, James Long. The Origin and Development of Public School Music in Baltimore to 1870. Ed.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1970.
George, Luvenia Anne. The Early Piano Rags (1899-1916) of James Hubert ('Eubie') Blake: A Stylistic Study and Annotated Edition. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland Baltimore County, 1995.
Headley, Robert K. Motion Picture Exhibition in Washington, D.C.: An Illustrated History of Parlors, Palaces and Multiplexes in the Metropolitan Area, 1894-1997. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, 1999.
Heyl, Edgar. "Plays by Marylanders, 1870-1916." Maryland Historical Magazine 62 (1967): 438-447.