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Adler, Georgia. "How Distinctly I Now Recollect What Then Passed: The Journals of William E. Bartlett." Maryland Humanities (March/April 1994): 2-3.
Preston, Dickson J. Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: There are a number of excellent biographies of Frederick Douglass including works by Eric Foner, William McFeeley and Benjamin Quarles. For the student of Maryland history, Preston's short but well-researched book focuses on the first twenty years of Douglass' life spent in Talbot County and Baltimore City. His experiences as a slave in Maryland shaped his subsequent career and thus are critical to understanding one of the greatest spokesmen for human rights.
Wilson, Emily Wanda. The Public Education of Negroes on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Hurst, Harold W. "Notes on Antebellum Easton." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Summer 1993): 181-88.
Annotation / Notes: Although a small population center, Easton, during the nineteenth century, was the major town of the Eastern Shore. The Shore's banking, its hotels, newspapers, and political activity all centered on the community.
Jopp, Harold D. Rediscovery of the Eastern Shore: Delmarva Travelogues of the 1870s. Wye Mills, MD: Chesapeake College Press, 1986.
Annotation / Notes: Reprints of articles by four different authors which appeared in the leading nineteenth century publications of Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Lippincott's Magazine, and Scribner's Monthly. The authors included noted illustrator Howard Pyle and Maryland writer George Townsend.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Ridgway, Whitman Hawley. A Social Analysis of Maryland Community Elites, 1827-1836: A Study of the Distribution of Power in Baltimore City, Frederick County and Talbot County. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1973.
Ridgway, Whitman H. Community Leadership in Maryland, 1790-1840. A Comparative Analysis of Power in Society. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Applying social science methodology to reconstruct patterns of decision making and their significance, this work examines the formation of elites in four political communities representing the diversity of the state (Baltimore City, and the counties of Frederick, St. Mary's, and Talbot) in two political eras (the Jeffersonian and the Jacksonian). In the more rural areas, such as St. Mary's and Talbot counties, decision makers overlapped with those who held public office and dominated community affairs, and little changed between the two periods. Where there was greater social and economic diversity, the patterns were considerably different. Elites became more specialized forcing decision makers to accommodate the demands of new leaders who represented a expanding popular political base. Members of the different elites (decisional, commercial, positional and traditional) are identified, along with individual socio-economic information, in the appendices.
Russo, Jean B. "The Wonderful Lady and the Fourth of July: Popular Culture in the Early National Period." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Summer 1995): 180-93.
Primus, Rebecca. Beloved Sisters and Loving Friends: Letters of Rebecca Primus of Royal Oak, Maryland, and Addie Brown of Hartford, Connecticut, 1854-1868. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1999.
Leonard, R. Bernice. Bound to Serve: The Indentured Children in Talbot County, Maryland, 1794-1920. St. Michael's, MD: The Author, 1983.