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White, Frank F., Jr. "James Butcher: Maryland's Forgotten Acting Governor." Maryland and Delaware Genealogist 15 (January 1974): 6-8.
Wilcox, Leonard. V. F. Calverton: Radical in the American Grain. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1992.
Will, Thomas E. "Bradley T. Johnson's Lost Cause: Maryland's Confederate Identity in the New South." Maryland Historical Magazine 94 (Spring 1999): 4-29.
Williams, Juan. Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary. New York: Times Books, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. His rise from a modest upbringing in Baltimore is chronicled in this biography by journalist Juan Williams. Marshall's 1954 victory as the lead attorney in Brown v. Board of Education established his standing as a champion in the Civil Rights movement. Early in his career as a lawyer for the NAACP, Marshall argued the case that led to the desegregation of the University of Maryland.
Witcover, Jules. White Knight: The Rise of Spiro Agnew. New York: Random House, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Spiro Agnew rose from Baltimore County Executive to Governor of Maryland to Vice President under Richard Nixon. Although he did not complete his term as Governor, Agnew was instrumental in reforming and reorganizing the state government. He got the attention of the national Republican Party for his firm response to the racial and political unrest of the 1960s. As Vice President, Agnew gained acclaim and notoriety for speeches that attacked the administration's opponents. Ultimately, a criminal indictment for activities that occurred in his Baltimore County days led to his resignation as Vice President.
Steiner, Bernard Christian. Life and administration of Sir Robert Eden. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1898; reprint. New York: Johnson Reprint Corp., 1973.
Abingbade, Harrison Ola. "The Settler-African Conflicts: The Case of the Maryland Colonists and the Grebo 1840-1900." Journal of Negro History 66 (Summer 1981): 93-109.
Adams, Marseta. "H. Rap Brown: 'Fight for your Rights.'" Calvert Historian 11 (Fall 1996): 53-67.
Aidt-Guy, Anita Louise. Persistent Maryland: Anti-slavery Activity between 1850 and 1864. Ph.D. diss., Georgetown University, 1994.
Alpert, Jonathan L. "The Origin of Slavery in the United States: The Maryland Precedent." American Journal of Legal History 14 (1970): 189-222.
Annotation / Notes: Maryland was the "first province in English North America to recognize slavery as a matter of law" (189). Therefore, the study of Maryland is useful for historians studying how American slavery was a product of the law. Early legislation recognized the existence of slavery, for while indentured servitude and slavery co-existed, and the terms were used interchangeably, the law still distinguished between the two. "All slaves were servants but not all servants were slaves" (193). However, it wasn't until 1664 when a statue was created which established slavery as hereditary. This statute was the first law in English North American to thus establish this type of slavery, legalizing what had been de facto since 1639. The author concludes that laws reflect the attitudes of a society and the manner in which societal problems are resolved. In the case of Maryland, servant problems could be avoided by replacing indentured servitude with perpetual slavery.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. Power and Poverty: Theory and Practice. New York: Oxford University Press, 1970.
Bachrach, Peter, and Morton S. Baratz. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Banks, Theresa Douglas. The Development of Public Education for the Negro in Prince George's County (1872-1946). M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1948.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Baugh, Joyce A. "Justice Thurgood Marshall: Advocate for Gender Justice." Western Journal of Black Studies 20 (Winter 1996): 195-206.
Bell, Howard H. "The Negro Emigration Movement, 1849-1854: A Phase of Negro Nationalism." Phylon 20 (1959): 132-142.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Berlin, Ira. Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South. New York: Pantheon Books, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: The author spends some time discussing Maryland, and the Upper South in general, in order to emphasize geographic distinctions which impacted the status of free Negroes. He postulates that the treatment and status of free blacks foreshadowed the treatment of black people in general after emancipation. In addition, the author examines the various classes of free blacks to understand how different groups viewed their social role. For the elite, positions of leadership continued after the Civil War. Maryland is of particular interest since by 1810, almost one-quarter of Maryland's black population was free. Maryland therefore had the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Bogen, David S. "The Annapolis Poll Books of 1800 and 1804: African American Voting in the Early Republic." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Spring 1991): 57-65.
Bogen, David Skillen. "The First Integration of the University of Maryland School of Law." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 39-49.
Boles, John B. "Tension in a Slave Society: The Trial of the Reverend Jacob Gruber." Southern Studies 18 (Summer 1979): 179-97.
Borome, Joseph A. "The Vigilant Committee of Philadelphia." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 92 (1968): 320-351.
Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Bridner, Elwood L., Jr. The Mason-Dixon Line and the Fugitive Slave. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1966.