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Anderson, George M., S. J. "The Approach of the Civil War as Seen in the Letters of James and Mary Anderson of Rockville." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Summer 1993): 189-202.
Coryell, Janet L. Neither Heroine Nor Fool: Anna Ella Carroll of Maryland. Ph.D. diss., College of William and Mary, 1986.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Smart, Jeffery K. "Burning Bridges: The Events Leading Up to the Military Occupation of Harford County in 1861." Harford Historical Bulletin 72 (Spring 1997): 9-56.
Barton, Donald Scott. Divided Houses: The Civil War Party System in the Border States. Ph.D. diss., Texas A&M University, 1991.
Catton, Bruce. "A Southern Artist on the Civil War." American Heritage 9 (1958): 117-120.
Towers, Frank, ed. "Military Waif: A Sidelight on the Baltimore Riot of 19 April 1861." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Winter 1994): 427-46.
Henig, Gerald S. Henry Winter Davis: Antebellum and Civil War Congressman from Maryland. New York: Twayne Press, 1973.
Annotation / Notes: A sympathetic biography of a leading Maryland politician who died in 1866 at the early age of forty-eight. A gifted orator and political writer, and a passionate opponent of the Democratic Party, Davis initially associated with the Whig Party, which was popular in the north but less so in the south, just as it was in the throes of disintegration. He then aligned with the newly formed Know Nothing Party, whose primary appeal was nativism and anti-Catholicism, and was elected to Congress in 1855. He was a leading opponent of the Buchanan administration and an early supporter of Abraham Lincoln. Active in trying to stem the tide of secession and to keep Maryland in the Union, he hoped for a Cabinet position, but Montgomery Blair won the appointment. At odds with his constituents, he was defeated for re-election and his political career appeared to be ended. He became gradually disenchanted with Lincoln's leadership, and, after re-election to Congress as a Unconditional Unionist, he led the effort to reassert Congressional leadership over reconstruction policies. When the President pocket-vetoed the Wade-Davis bill, he issued a highly publicized protest manifesto and actively opposed Lincoln's renomination. During the 1864 campaign, however, he decided that the Democratic candidate, McClellan, was a greater threat, so he campaigned for the Republican ticket. Davis also played a decisive role in the writing and ratification of the Maryland constitution of 1864. Once again his radical position eroded his constituent base and he was not renominated for his Congressional seat.
Coryell, Janet L. "'The Lincoln Colony': Aaron Columbus Burr's Proposed Colonization of British Honduras." Civil War History 43 (1997): 5-16.
Sebesta, Edward H., and Euan Hague. "The US Civil War as a Theological War: Confederate Christian Nationalism and the League of the South." Canadian Review of American Studies [Canada], 32 (no. 3, 2002): 253-83.
Gaede, Frederick. "Military Prisoners in the Baltimore City Jail, 1864." Maryland Historical Magazine, 89 (Winter 1994): 467-68.
Barney, William L. "The Urban South and the Coming of the Civil War." Civil War History, 52 (September 2006): 318-19.
Cunz, Dieter. "The Maryland Germans in the Civil War." Maryland Historical Magazine, 100 (Fall 2005): 359-81.
Towers, Frank. "Strange Bedfellows: The Union Party and the Federal Government in Civil War Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine, 106 (Spring 2011): 6-35.
White, Jonathan W. Abraham Lincoln and Treason: the trials of John Merryman. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2011.
Norris, Dan. "Civil Disobedience During the Civil War: Running the Chesapeake Blockade." Shoreline, 20 (December 2013): 12-14.
Harris, William C. Lincoln and the Border States: Preserving the Union. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 2011.
McNish, Megan E. "'Spare your country's flag': Unionist Sentiment in Frederick, Maryland, 1860-1865." Gettysburg College Journal of the Civil War Era, 6 (2016): 75-106.
Kastenberg, Joshua E. A Confederate in Congress: The Civil War Treason Trial of Benjamin Gwinn Harris. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2016.