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1-25 of 74 results
Cramton, Willa G. "Selleck Osborn: a Republican Editor in Wilmington, Delaware, 1816-1822." Delaware History 12 (1967): 198-217.
Crowder, Ralph Leroy. John Edward Bruce and the Value of Knowing the Past: Politician, Journalist, and Self-Trained Historian of the African Diaspora, 1856-1924. Ph.D. diss., University of Kansas, 1994.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Farrar, Hayward. "The Baltimore Afro-American's Crusade Against Racism in Employment, 1892-1950." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 6.
Fehrenbacker, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Most important case of Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from Maryland.
Goldstein, Leslie F. "Violence as an Instrument for Social Change: The Views of Frederick Douglass, 1819-1895." Journal of Negro History 41 (January 1976): 61-72.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Quarles, Benjamin. "Frederick Douglass: Bridge-builder in Human Relations." Negro History Bulletin 29 (1966): 99-100, 112.
Trefzer, Annette. "'Let us all be Kissing-Friends?' Zora Neale Hurston and Race Politics in Dixie." Journal of American Studies [Cambridge] 31 (April 1997): 69-78.
West, Margaret Genevieve. Zora Neale Hurston's Place in American Literary Culture: A Study of the Politics of Race and Gender. Ph.D. diss., Florida State University, 1997.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Bode, Carl, ed. The Editor, the Bluenose, and the Prostitute: H. L. Mencken's History of the "Hatrack" Censorship Case. Boulder, CO: Roberts Rinehart, 1988.
Breslaw, Elaine G. "Wit, Whimsy, and Politics: The Uses of Satire by the Tuesday Club of Annapolis, 1744 to 1756." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d series, 32 (April 1975): 295-306.
Annotation / Notes: An introduction to the group of Annapolis wits whose humorous proceedings have survived in a manuscript at the Johns Hopkins University. The antics of the Tuesday Club open a window on the climate of civil discourse that characterized the Golden Era in Annapolis. In contrast to the political tensions that would soon led to revolution, club members employed parodies to mock political conventions. The actual minutes of the club as edited by Professor Breslaw have been published as the Records of the Tuesday Club, 1745 - 1756.
Chambers, Tom. "Political Parties, Their Newspapers and Their Battling Editors." Harford Historical Bulletin 50 (Fall 1991): 101-12.
Chambers, Tom. "Political Upheaval Brings Upheaval in Harford County Newspaper Publishing." Harford Historical Bulletin 50 (Fall 1991): 113-27.
Chambers, Tom. "The Travail of Early Newspapers in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 50 (Fall 1991): 96-100.
Clark, Michael D. "Jonathan Boucher: the Mirror of Reaction." Huntington Library Quarterly 33 (1969): 19-32.
Copeland, David. "'Join or Die:' America's Newspapers in the French and Indian War." Journalism History 24 (Autumn 1998): 112-21.
Dudden, Arthur Power. "The Record of Political Humor." American Quarterly 37 (Spring 1985): 50-70.
Annotation / Notes: H. L. Mencken.
Ehrlich, Howard J., and Mary Lou Bauer. "Newspaper Citation and Reputation for Community Leadership." American Sociological Review 30 (1965): 411-415.
Grant, Philip A., Jr. "Maryland Press Reaction to the Roosevelt-Tydings Confrontation." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 422-437.
Kallaugher, Kevin. Kal Draws the Line: Political Cartoons. Baltimore: Sunsource, 2000.