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Fleet, Betsy. Henry Fleete: Pioneer, Explorer, Trader, Planter, Legislator, Justice and Peacemaker. St. Stephens Church, VA: Published by the author, 1989.
George, Christopher T. "The Feuding Governors: Andros and Nicholson at Odds in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Fall 1995): 334-48.
Hardy, Beatriz Betancourt. "'A most Turbulent and Seditious person': Thomas Macnemara of Maryland." Maryland Humanities (January 1999): 8-11.
Hoffman, Ronald. "'Marylando-Hibernus': Charles Carroll the Settler, 1660-1720." William and Mary Quarterly 45 (April 1988): 207-36.
Humes, James C. "Andrew Hamilton: the 'Philadelphia Lawyer.'" American Bar Association Journal 55 (1969): 227-231.
Sioussat, Anne Leakin. "Lionel Copley, First Royal Governor of Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 18 (1922): 163-77.
Webb, Stephen S. "The Strange Career of Francis Nicholson." William and Mary Quarterly 23 (1966): 513-548.
Alpert, Jonathan L. "The Origin of Slavery in the United States: The Maryland Precedent." American Journal of Legal History 14 (1970): 189-222.
Annotation / Notes: Maryland was the "first province in English North America to recognize slavery as a matter of law" (189). Therefore, the study of Maryland is useful for historians studying how American slavery was a product of the law. Early legislation recognized the existence of slavery, for while indentured servitude and slavery co-existed, and the terms were used interchangeably, the law still distinguished between the two. "All slaves were servants but not all servants were slaves" (193). However, it wasn't until 1664 when a statue was created which established slavery as hereditary. This statute was the first law in English North American to thus establish this type of slavery, legalizing what had been de facto since 1639. The author concludes that laws reflect the attitudes of a society and the manner in which societal problems are resolved. In the case of Maryland, servant problems could be avoided by replacing indentured servitude with perpetual slavery.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Saville, Julie. "Rites and Power: Reflections on Slavery, Freedom and Political Ritual." Slavery and Abolition [Great Britain] 20 (April 1999): 81-102.
Sharrer, George Terry. Slaveholding in Maryland, 1695-1775. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1968.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Wicek, William M. "The Statutory Law of Slavery and Race in the Thirteen Mainland Colonies of British America." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 34 (1977): 258-80.
Cook, Margaret W. "Early Towns in Calvert County." Calvert County Historical Society News and Notes 2 (April 1983): 12-13.
Papenfuse, Edward C. "What's in a Name? Why Should We Remember?" News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society 24 (June/July 1996): 1-5.
Papenfuse, Edward C. Doing Good to Posterity-The Move of the Capital of Maryland from St. Mary's City to Ann Arundell Towne, now called Annapolis. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1995.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.