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Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Callcott, Margaret Law. The Negro in Maryland Politics, 1870-1912. Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina, 1967.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines how Maryland was an exception to the history of disfranchisement following Reconstruction. Black men in Maryland exercised the right to vote with relative freedom. Black voter participation was consistently about equal to that of whites. Maryland therefore provides an opportunity to study black political participation, and the effects of black suffrage on the party system and policies in Maryland during this time.
Campbell, Penelope. Maryland in Africa: The Maryland State Colonization Society, 1831-1857. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1971.
Earp, Charles A. "The Role of Education in the Maryland Colonization Movement." Maryland Historical Magazine 26 (1941): 365-88.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Eschen, Donald Von, Jerome Kirk, and Maurice Pinard. "The Conditions of Direct Action in a Democratic Society." Western Political Quarterly 22 (1969): 309-325.
Fairley, Paul L. Desegregation Activities at Maryland's Historically Black Public Institutions for Undergraduate Higher Education. Ed.D. diss., University of Miami, 1986.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Favor, Homer Eli. The Effects of Racial Changes in Occupancy Patterns upon Property Values in Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1960.
Fehrenbacker, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Most important case of Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from Maryland.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Foeman, Anita K. "Gloria Richardson: Breaking the Mold." Journal of Black Studies 26, no. 5 (1996): 604-15.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Fowler, David Henry. "Freedom Fettered - Blacks and the Constitutional Era in Maryland 1776-1810." Maryland Pendulum (Special Issue 1987): 1-12.
Annotation / Notes: Summaries of papers presented at a conference at Morgan State University, October 1987.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Blacks, Whites, and Guns: Interracial Violence in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Fall 1997): 326-47.
Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.
Gardner, Bettye J. "Opposition to Emigration, a Selected Letter of William Watkins (The Colored Baltimorean)." Journal of Negro History 47 (Summer 1982): 155-158.
Goldstein, Leslie F. "Violence as an Instrument for Social Change: The Views of Frederick Douglass, 1819-1895." Journal of Negro History 41 (January 1976): 61-72.
Groves, Paul A., and Edward K. Muller. "The Evolution of Black Residential Areas in Late Nineteenth-Century Cities." Journal of Historical Geography 1 (April 1975): 169-91.
Annotation / Notes: Includes Baltimore.
Guy, Anita Aidt. Maryland's Persistent Pursuit to End Slavery, 1850-1864. New York: Garland Pub., 1997.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Harrold, Stanley. "Freeing the Weems Family: A New Look at the Underground Railroad." Civil War History 42 (December 1996): 289-306.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines conventional and scholarly interpretations of underground railroad by looking at the escape of the Weems family from the Chesapeake region of Maryland. By using the Weems family as a case study, the author challenges thirty years' worth of scholarship on the underground railroad. By examining a family that escaped from a border state, the author is able to explore both black self-determination and white assistance found in the records of this family's escape. In addition, the author examines a bi-racial network of non-Garrisonian abolitionists who raised money to purchase the freedom of slaves, or if that was not possible, to channel the money raised into effecting an escape plan.
Harris, Kirk Edward. The Paradox of African-American Mayoral Leadership and the Persistence of Poverty in the African-American Community. Ph.D. diss., Cornell University, 1992.
Harris, William C. "James Lynch: Black Leader in Southern Reconstruction." Historian 34 (1971): 40-61.
Hart, Ethel Juanita. Negro Suffrage in Maryland. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1934.