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Hodes, Michael C. "Kweisi Mfume." Maryland 29 (January/February 1997): 16-19, 59.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Kent, George Robert. The Negro in Politics in Dorchester County, Maryland, 1920-1960. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1961.
Kohn, Howard. We Had A Dream: A Tale of the Struggles for Integration in America. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998.
Kulikoff, Allan. "The Beginnings of the Afro-American Family in Maryland." In Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 171-96. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
Lampe, Gregory Paul. Frederick Douglass: Freedom's Voice, 1818-1845. Ph.D. diss., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995.
Levy, Peter B. "The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge, Maryland, during the 1960s." Viet Nam Generation 6, nos. 3-4 (1995): 96-107.
McConnell, Roland C. "Frederick Douglass--Invincible Freedom Fighter--And the Opening of the Douglass Institute." Maryland Pendulum (Summer 1991): 3-4.
Millner, Sandra Y. "Recasting Civil Rights Leadership: Gloria Richardson and the Cambridge Movement." Journal of Black Studies 26 (July 1996): 668-87.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the neglect by scholars of civil rights leader Gloria Richardson. Richardson was not part of the established civil rights movement, nor has she been celebrated in the same manner as other civil rights leaders. The author examines the possible reasons for Richardson's marginalization in histories of the movement, which stem, in part, from scholars not questioning the language and the conceptions of gender and class used to describe Richardson in the press. Richardson also focused her attention on economic issues while the established civil rights leadership continued to focus on civil rights. She was also one of the first leaders to openly question the tactic on nonviolence. These additional factors also contributed to a lack of recognition of Richardson's role in the Cambridge Movement.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia. "Black Housing Patterns in Baltimore City, 1885 - 1953." The Maryland Historian 16 (Spring/Summer 1985): 25-39.
Orser, W. Edward. "Secondhand Suburbs: Black Pioneers in Baltimore's Edmondson Village, 1955-1980." Urban History 16 (May 1990): 227-62.
Palumbos, Robert M. "Student Involvement in the Baltimore Civil Rights Movement, 1953-63." Maryland Historical Magazine 94 (Winter 1999): 448-92.
Posilkin, Robert Stuart. An Historical Study of the Desegregation of the Montgomery County, Maryland, Public Schools, 1954-1977. Ed.D. diss., George Washington University, 1979.
Powers, Tyrone. The Decline of Black Institutions and the Rise of Violent Crime in Urban Black America Post-Integration. Ph.D. diss., American University, 1998.
Putney, Martha S. "The Black Colleges in the Maryland State College System: Quest for Equal Opportunity, 1908-1975." Maryland Historical Magazine 75 (December 1980): 335-43.
Quarles, Benjamin. "Frederick Douglass: Bridge-builder in Human Relations." Negro History Bulletin 29 (1966): 99-100, 112.
Quarles, Benjamin. "'Freedom Fettered:' Blacks in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810 - An Introduction." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 299-304.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines how blacks in Maryland fared during the Constitutional Era, a period when questions of race and color, slavery and freedom, were being raised. For the free black population, there was the question of their status. After the Revolution, Maryland's slave and free black populations became more politically aware of the implications of living in a time of such change. The slogans of freedom and equality used during the Revolution were drawn upon by Maryland's black population in order to attempt to effect change.
Rollo, Vera F. The Black Experience in Maryland. Lanham, MD: Maryland Historical Press, 1980.
Rowan, Carl T. Dream Makers, Dream Breakers: The World of Justice Thurgood Marshall. New York: Little, Brown, 1993.
Saville, Julie. "Rites and Power: Reflections on Slavery, Freedom and Political Ritual." Slavery and Abolition [Great Britain] 20 (April 1999): 81-102.
Seawright, Sally. "Desegregation at Maryland: the NAACP and the Murray Case in the 1930's." Maryland Historian 1 (1970): 59-73.
Shoemaker, Sandy M. "'We Shall Overcome, Someday:' The Equal Rights Movement in Baltimore, 1935-1942." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 260-73.