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"From Statehouse to Statehouse." Maryland 27 (March/April 1995): 63, 65-66.
Papenfuse, Edward C. Doing Good to Posterity-The Move of the Capital of Maryland from St. Mary's City to Ann Arundell Towne, now called Annapolis. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1995.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Sword, Gerald J. "Acquisition of the Point Lookout Lighthouse Site by the United States Government from Jenifer Taylor." Chronicles of St. Mary's 26 (January 1978): 340-46.
Blodgett, Jan. "Developing Cooperative Archives to Meet the Needs of Small Institutions." Resources Sharing and Information Networks 11 (1996): 59-69.
Cox, Richard J. "Public Records in Colonial Maryland." American Archivist 37 (April 1974): 263-75.
Cox, Richard J. A Guide to Maryland State Archives Holdings of St. Mary's County Records on Microfilm. Annapolis: Maryland State Archives, 1989.
Holland, Eugenia C. "Anne Arundel Takes Over from St. Mary's." Maryland Historical Magazine 44 (1949) 42-51.
Knott, Harry C. "Two Hangings in St. Mary's County, Maryland." Chronicles of St. Mary's 41 (Summer 1993): 213-17.
Knott, Harry C. "Letters of John F. Dent of Burlington While a Member of the Maryland Assembly of 1864." Chronicles of St. Mary's 28 (November 1980): 257-67; (December 1980): 269-84.
Loker, William Aleck. "Calvert's Bold Venture: The Origins of Human Rights and Democracy in America." Chronicles of St. Mary's 46 (Spring 1998): 265-74.
Menard, Russell R. "'Maryland's 'Time of Troubles:' Sources of Political Disorder in Early St. Mary's." Maryland Historical Magazine 76 (Summer 1981): 124-40.
Annotation / Notes: An excellent analysis of the difficulty faced by the Calverts in establishing a stable political system in Maryland in the first several decades of settlement. Confronted with William Claiborne's commercial outpost on Kent Island, and hostility from other Virginians and their supporters in London, not to mention Richard Ingle's almost fatal attack on the colony in the mid-1640s, Lord Baltimore used his considerable influence and political skill to protect his interests. Within the colony, the ostensible Catholic hegemony was rent by a dispute between the Proprietor and the Jesuits over their influence in secular affairs, and his goal of establishing a hierarchical manorial political system was undermined by the ease with which indentured servants could obtain land and influence.
Papenfuse, Edward C. "Remarks on the History of the Maryland Legislature, 1643-1694." Chronicles of St. Mary's 32 (May 1984): 149-155.
Raley, J. Frank, Jr. "The Senate Desk 1776 to 1966." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Fall 1992): 145-48.
Raley, J. Frank, Jr. "Recognizing Maryland's Role in 'The First Freedom.'" A Briefe Relation 21 (Spring 1999): 1, 8.
Roberts, David. "St. Mary's Elects the President, 1840-1980." Chronicles of St. Mary's 28 (September 1980): 225-29.
Social Studies Seminar, Chopticon High School, Morganza, St. Mary's County, Maryland. "St. Mary's County, Maryland, Cemetery Indexes." Maryland and Delaware Genealogist 21 (January 1980): 4-5.
Social Studies Seminar, Chopticon High School, Morganza, St. Mary's County, Maryland. "St. Mary's County, Maryland, Cemetery Indexes." Maryland and Delaware Genealogist 21 (April 1980): 36-37.
Social Studies Seminar, Chopticon High School, Morganza, St. Mary's County, Maryland. "St. Mary's County, Maryland, Cemetery Indexes." Maryland and Delaware Genealogist 21 (July 1980): 68-69.
Social Studies Seminar, Chopticon High School, Morganza, St. Mary's County, Maryland. "St. Mary's County, Maryland, Cemetery Indexes." Maryland and Delaware Genealogist 21 (October 1980): 100-01.
Stevens, L. Tomlin. "Maryland and the Adoption of the Federal Constitution." Chronicles of St. Mary's 35 (Fall 1987): 49-54.
Stewart, Oliver D., Jr. "350 Years of Service: St. Mary's County Sheriff's Department." Chronicles of St. Mary's 35 (Winter 1987): 77.
Carr, Lois Green. "Sources of Political Stability and Upheaval in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Spring 1984): 44-70.
Annotation / Notes: Challenging the prevailing notion that seventeenth century Maryland politics were inherently chaotic, Carr argues that community networks were being formed through which information was exchanged and community oversight imposed, and that County courts emerged as de facto local governments. Local men, who may have been planters or former indentured servants, were appointed as justices. During the hiatus following the Revolution of 1689 local government continued to operate. After discussing the various political crises before and after 1689, Carr concludes that the underlying cause of Maryland's political instability was a failure of leadership of the men at the top of Maryland society.
Ridgway, Whitman H. Community Leadership in Maryland, 1790-1840. A Comparative Analysis of Power in Society. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: Applying social science methodology to reconstruct patterns of decision making and their significance, this work examines the formation of elites in four political communities representing the diversity of the state (Baltimore City, and the counties of Frederick, St. Mary's, and Talbot) in two political eras (the Jeffersonian and the Jacksonian). In the more rural areas, such as St. Mary's and Talbot counties, decision makers overlapped with those who held public office and dominated community affairs, and little changed between the two periods. Where there was greater social and economic diversity, the patterns were considerably different. Elites became more specialized forcing decision makers to accommodate the demands of new leaders who represented a expanding popular political base. Members of the different elites (decisional, commercial, positional and traditional) are identified, along with individual socio-economic information, in the appendices.
Jensen, Anne. "Is This Justice?" Annapolitan 4 (June 1990): 46-49.
Annotation / Notes: Margaret Brent.