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Bidwell, Percy W., and John I. Falconer. History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1925.
Annotation / Notes: Mentions Maryland only regarding farming in 1840 and peach orchards, but is useful since so many Pennsylvania Germans settled in Frederick County.
Gibb, James G. "The Dorsey-Bibb Tobacco Flue: Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Southern Maryland Agriculture." Calvert Historian 12 (Spring 1997): 4-20.
Gray, Lewis C. History of Agriculture in the Southern United States to 1860. 2 vols. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1933.
Annotation / Notes: From barley to wool, Gray's great work is unsurpassed in its detail about farming from Maryland's founding to the Civil War.
Pursell, Carroll W., Jr. "The Administration of Science in the Department of Agriculture, 1933-1940." Agricultural History 42 (1968): 231-240.
Annotation / Notes: Henry A. Wallace, Franklin Roosevelt's first Secretary of Agriculture, championed scientific research because he himself was scientist a hybrid corn breeder. Using emergency relief funds from the National Recovery Administration, Wallace, in 1934, transformed the small experiment station in Beltsville into a great national research center. The Bankhead-Jones Act then funded the basic research agenda.
Calderwood, Paul T. "The Keyser Ridge Creamery." Glades Star 5 (September 1977): 33-35.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Erlick, David P. "The Peales and Gas Lights in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Spring 1985): 9-18.
Annotation / Notes: In 1816 Baltimore became the first city lite by gas lighting. What began as exhibitions at the Peale Museum became the Gas Light Company of Baltimore.
Mackie, Norman Vardney, III. "Gravestone Procurement in St. Mary's County, 1634-1820." Maryland Historical Magazine 83 (Fall 1988): 229-40.
Annotation / Notes: Thirteen cemeteries were evaluated in this study which demonstrates the socio-economic data that can be compiled from the use and construction type of gravestones. The raw materials of the stones, their style, and the distribution of the stones can all be evaluated and the economic condition of the time deduced. For example, as more prosperous wheat growing farmers populated the area more money was spent on permanent markers. Also, as sandstone became available in the county more tombstone carvers were able to work in the area.
Meyer, Eric. "Pax River, Lexington Park: The Right Place for the Right Stuff." Maryland 22 (Autumn 1989): 44-49.
Olson, Sherry H. Baltimore: The Building of an American City. Revised edition. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The product of a geographer, this excellent history of Baltimore focuses on its physical growth as an urban center. Special emphasis is placed on how the city, and its inhabitants, handled the changes brought about by city growth.
Johnson, Paula J. Working the Water: The Commercial Fisheries of Maryland's Patuxent River. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: Johnson's book covers many of the fishing techniques and inventions which have so strongly impacted Chesapeake Bay's natural resources.
Alvarez, Rafael. "Stove Shop Now A Warm Memory." In Hometown Boy: The Hoodle Patrol and Other Curiosities of Baltimore. Baltimore: Baltimore Sun, 1999, 292-293.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore Museum of Industry.
Blazczyk, R. L. "[Baltimore Museum of Industry]." Journal of American History 80 (June 1993): 203-10.
Gelbert, Doug. Company Museums, Industry Museums, and Industrial Tours: A Guidebook of Sites in the United States That Are Open to the Public. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc., 1994. 94-104.
Annotation / Notes: Brief descriptions of fifteen industrial sites in Maryland. When considering sites on this topic most museum goers would probably know of the Baltimore Museum of Industry but people may overlook many of the other sites covered, such as the Ocean City Lifesaving Station Museum, the Poultry Hall of Fame, and the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Visitor Center.
LeGath, Judy. "Museum Receives Collection of Tools Used to Produce Kirk's Famous 'Baltimore Silver' On Display in New Kirk-Stieff Exhibit." Nuts and Bolts 13 (Summer 1995): [4].
Carlson, Robert E. "British Railroads and Engineers and the Beginnings of American Railroad Development." Business History Review 34 (1960): 137-149.
Carmer, Carl. The Susquehanna. New York: Rinehart, 1955.
Annotation / Notes: One of the prestigious "Rivers of America" series, and for Marylanders a book-end volume to Frederick Gutheim's The Potomac. This is popular history at its best: powerfully-written, anecdotal--and what anecdotes! The story of Thomas Cresap is alone worth checking the book out of the library. Covers the downriver ark traffic and the attempts of steamboats to conquer the rocky and unruly Susquehanna.
Chevalier, Michel. Histoire et description des voies de communication aux États Unis et des travaux d'art qui en dépendent [History and Description of the Channels of Communication of the United States...]. Paris: 1841.
Annotation / Notes: A good deal of important early information on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad is contained in two volumes, one of text and the other of maps and illustrations, by the French economist and advocate of industrial development as the key to social progress. Other railroads and canals are also given extensive treatment.
Davis, Milton A., and Charles S. Roberts. B&O Salute. Baltimore: Barnard, Roberts & Co., 1987.
Edson, William D. "Steam Locomotives of the Western Maryland." Railroad History 155 (Autumn 1986): 87-110.
Franklin, William M. "The Tidewater End of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal." Maryland Historical Magazine 81 (Winter 1986): 288-304.