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Bidwell, Percy W., and John I. Falconer. History of Agriculture in the Northern United States, 1620-1860. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1925.
Annotation / Notes: Mentions Maryland only regarding farming in 1840 and peach orchards, but is useful since so many Pennsylvania Germans settled in Frederick County.
Gray, Lewis C. History of Agriculture in the Southern United States to 1860. 2 vols. Washington, DC: Carnegie Institution, 1933.
Annotation / Notes: From barley to wool, Gray's great work is unsurpassed in its detail about farming from Maryland's founding to the Civil War.
Kurtz, Michael J. John Gottlieb Morris: Man of God, Man of Science. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1997.
Kurtz, Michael J. "Being a Renaissance Man in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore: John Gottlieb Morris." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Summer 1994): 156-69.
Porter, Frank W. "John Widgeon: Naturalist, Curator and Philosopher." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Winter 1984): 325-331.
Rogers, Ellen. "James Harris Rogers, Scientist." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society 13 (July-August 1985): 31-34.
Turner, Ella May. James Rumsey, Pioneer in Steam Navigation. Scottdale, PA: Mennonite Publishing House, 1930.
Erickson, Marie Anne. "Thurmont." Historical Society of Frederick County Journal [3] (Summer 1994): 5-6.
Erlick, David P. "The Peales and Gas Lights in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Spring 1985): 9-18.
Annotation / Notes: In 1816 Baltimore became the first city lite by gas lighting. What began as exhibitions at the Peale Museum became the Gas Light Company of Baltimore.
McGrain, John W. "Historical Aspects of Lake Roland." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (September 1979): 253-73.
Mackie, Norman Vardney, III. "Gravestone Procurement in St. Mary's County, 1634-1820." Maryland Historical Magazine 83 (Fall 1988): 229-40.
Annotation / Notes: Thirteen cemeteries were evaluated in this study which demonstrates the socio-economic data that can be compiled from the use and construction type of gravestones. The raw materials of the stones, their style, and the distribution of the stones can all be evaluated and the economic condition of the time deduced. For example, as more prosperous wheat growing farmers populated the area more money was spent on permanent markers. Also, as sandstone became available in the county more tombstone carvers were able to work in the area.
Mackie, Norman Vardney, III. Praising the Bridge that Brought them Over: One Hundred Years at Indian Head. Indian Head, MD: Naval Ordnance Station, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: The history of the military base, and its surrounding community, as told through photographs and excerpts with interviews from twenty-six individuals. A ten page time line charts events of importance among the Navy at Indian Head, in the town of Indian Head, and national and internationally.
Smart, Jeffery K. "From Plowshare to Sword: Historical Highlights of Gunpowder Neck and Edgewood Arsenal to the End of World War I." Harford Historical Bulletin 63 (Winter 1995): 3-49.
Bennion, V.R., D.F. Dougherty, and Robert M. Overbeck. The Water Resources of Calvert County. Bulletin 8. Baltimore: Department of Geology, Mines and Water Resources, 1951.
Brooks, William K. The Oyster. 1891; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1966.
Cowles, R.P. "A Biological Study of the Offshore Waters of Chesapeake Bay." Bulletin of the United States Bureau of Fisheries 46 (1930): 277-381.
Annotation / Notes: Cowles and his predecessor Lewis Radcliffe were the first to do coordinated studies of the hydrography and biology of the Bay, from 1915 to 1922. The kinds of organisms they found suggest the Bay was not yet experiencing the chronic summer loss of deep water dissolved oxygen encountered in today's polluted estuary.
Eble, Albert F., Victor S. Kennedy, and Roger E.I. Newell, eds. The Eastern Oyster: Crassostrea virginica. College Park, MD: Maryland Sea Grant College, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: A comprehensive update on oyster biology, and an impressive work.
Johnson, Paula J. Working the Water: The Commercial Fisheries of Maryland's Patuxent River. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: Johnson's book covers many of the fishing techniques and inventions which have so strongly impacted Chesapeake Bay's natural resources.
Keiner, Christine. "W. K. Brooks and the Oyster Question: Science, Politics, and Resource Management in Maryland, 1880-1930." Journal of the History of Biology [Netherlands] 31 (Fall 1998): 383-424.
Maryland Geological Survey. Calvert County. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1907.
Stevenson, C. H. "The Oyster Industry in Maryland." Bulletin of the United States Bureau of Fisheries (1892): 203-297.
Annotation / Notes: Stevenson foresaw far in advance a coming disaster for the oyster industry. Oh, had we only heeded his wise counsel!
Uhler, P. R., and Otto Lugger. List of Fishes of Maryland. Annapolis, MD: John Wiley, 1876.
Sprenkle, Elam Ray. The Life and Works of Louis Cheslock. D.M.A. diss., Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1979.
Annotation / Notes: The life of Louis Cheslock proveds an expansive view of the musical life of Baltimore from the 'teens to the 1970s. Cheslock's story begins in 1893 when his older brother, Henry Czeslak, fled from Poland to England to avoid conscription into the Russian army and changed his name to Rosenberg to avoid detection. His parents followed and eventually moved to Baltimore with their children. Louis Cheslock was one of the original members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra (founded in 1916), a faculty member at Peabody from 1922 to 1976, a member of Henry Mencken's Saturday Night Club from 1927 to its final gathering in 1950, a composer who wrote over 150 works (including opera in collaboration with Mencken), writer and music critic. Cheslock witnessed and wrote on the emergence of jazz as an art form, the rise of radio and the scientific study of music.
Carter, Edward C., II. "The Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe and the Maryland Historical Society, 1885-1971: Nature, Structure and Means of Acquisition." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 436-455.
Annotation / Notes: An involved discussion of the provenance of the Latrobe collection and the project to microfilm it. Latrobe, a prominent architect, artist, and surveyor, among other talents, left a variety of materials, including drawings depicting America at the end of the eighteenth century. An interesting discussion of the history of a rich collection.
Carter, Edward C., II, Editor in Chief, and Thomas E. Jeffrey, Microfiche Editor. The Guide and Index to the Microfiche Edition of the Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Clifton, NJ: Published for the Maryland Historical Society by James T. White and Co., 1976.