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Hopkins, Henry Powell. Colonial Houses of Annapolis, Maryland, and Their Architectural Details. Baltimore: n.p., 1963.
Baker, Nancy T. "Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1730." Maryland Historical Magazine 81 (Fall 1986): 191-209.
Annotation / Notes: This study describes the first phase in Annapolis's development as an urban center. It covers the period in which the community progressed from a settlement to a city. This period was marked by three patterns of development -- the acquisition of land, a growth in the population, and the town's evolution as a market for imported goods.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "Shipley's Choice: A Community Name with Historical Significance; Part I: The Shipley Clan." Anne Arundel County History Notes 20 (January 1989): 3-5.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "The Shipley's Choice Tract; Part II: More Than Three Centuries of Fascinating History." Anne Arundel County History Notes 20 (April 1989): 1-3.
Papenfuse, Edward C. Doing Good to Posterity-The Move of the Capital of Maryland from St. Mary's City to Ann Arundell Towne, now called Annapolis. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1995.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Shomette, Donald. London Town: A Brief History. Londontown, MD: London Town Public House Commission, Inc., 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Londontown, located on the South River, was a very early example of successful town planning in Maryland. The community, however, did not have any long term success due to its economic base in the tobacco system.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "The Town of Herrington, c. 1667-c. 1700." Anne Arundel County History Notes 29 (July 1998): 1-2, 9-12.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "The Town of Herrington, c.1667-c.1700." Calvert Historian 13 (Spring 1998): 45-61.
Annotation / Notes: Same article as in Anne Arundel County History Notes.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "Seeking Herrington: Settlement in a Very Early Maryland Town." Maryland Archeology 34 (September 1998): 11-17.
Annotation / Notes: Herrington, in southern Anne Arundel, was one of many very small towns in Maryland during the Colonial period. These towns generally had no municipal government. To research such communities scholars must rely on governmental records documenting landowners and residents. After Herrington's demise, shortly after 1700, the area remained predominantly agricultural. This resulted in its location remaining largely intact. Thus, it is a promising archeological site for research.
Brown, Anne W. "The Phoenix: a History of the St. John's College Library." Maryland Historical Magazine 65 (1970): 413-429.
Cox, Richard J. The Origins of Archival Development in Maryland, 1634-1934. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Cox presents the development of what he argued were Maryland's three most important archival institutions -- the Maryland Historical Society, the Maryland State Archives, and the Baltimore City Archives. Some discussion is also given to the development of the history profession in Maryland.
Cox, Richard J. "Public Records in Colonial Maryland." American Archivist 37 (April 1974): 263-75.
Pyatt, Timothy, Dean Yates, and Stephanie Thorson. "Devices and Desires: Realizing Wider Understanding and Access to Maryland's Recorded Heritage." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Winter 1992): 436-52.
Annotation / Notes: This article describes, at the series level, collections housed by the Maryland State Archives. It is the only identified major Maryland Historical Magazine article to present holdings of the Archives or of any other institution that is not the Maryland Historical Society.
Radoff, Morris L. "Early Annapolis Records." Maryland Historical Magazine 35 (March 1940): 74-5.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Standard of Living in the Colonial Chesapeake." William and Mary Quarterly 45 (January 1988): 135-59.
Annotation / Notes: Carr and Walsh make detailed use of probate records from seventeenth and eighteenth century Maryland to argue that the period in Chesapeake area history represented a shift from an early emphasis upon material necessities to an improved standard of living marked by "gentility." The authors contend that this change reached across class lines and helped to fuel, rather than check, the productive economy of the colony. The article includes extensive tables and graphs of evidence regarding consumer items for several Maryland and Virginia counties.
Virta, Alan. "Two Women of Prince George's County." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 21 (October 1993): 3-4.
Carroll, Kenneth L. "The Honorable Thomas Taillor: a Tale of Two Wives." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (1990): 379-394.
Cox, C. Jane, Dennis Kavadias, and Al Luckenbach. "Skipworth's Addition (1664-1682): Limited Testing at a 17th Century Quaker Homelot, Anne Arundel County, Maryland." Maryland Archeology 36 (March 2000): 1-10.
Newman, Harry Wright. Mareen Duvall of Middle Plantation: A Genealogical History of Mareen Duvall, Gent., of the Province of Maryland and His Descendants With Histories of the Allied Families of Tyler, Clarke, Poole, Hall, and Merriken. Reprint. N.p.: The Society of Mareen Duvall Descendants, 1976.
Luckenbach, Al, and James G. Gibb. "Dated Window Leads from Colonial Sites in Anne Arundel County, Maryland." Maryland Archeology, 30 (September 1994): 23-28.
Shackel, Paul A. Personal Discipline and Material Culture: An Archaeology of Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1870. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1993.