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Coffin, Lewis A., Jr., and Arthur C. Holden. Brick Architecture of the Colonial Period in Maryland & Virginia. N.p., 1919.
Davis, Vernon Perdue, and James Scott Rawlings. The Colonial Churches of Virginia, Maryland, and North Carolina; Their Interiors and Worship. Richmond, VA: Dietz Press, 1985.
Day, Donna Goldsmith. Inns and Colonial Homes of Maryland. Gambrills, MD: Eastwind Publishing, 1995.
Hopkins, Henry Powell. Colonial Houses of Annapolis, Maryland, and Their Architectural Details. Baltimore: n.p., 1963.
Lebherz, Ann, and Mary Margrabe. Pre-1800 Houses of Frederick County, Volume II. Frederick, MD: Frederick County Historical Society, 1999.
Baker, Nancy T. "Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1730." Maryland Historical Magazine 81 (Fall 1986): 191-209.
Annotation / Notes: This study describes the first phase in Annapolis's development as an urban center. It covers the period in which the community progressed from a settlement to a city. This period was marked by three patterns of development -- the acquisition of land, a growth in the population, and the town's evolution as a market for imported goods.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "The Shipley's Choice Tract; Part II: More Than Three Centuries of Fascinating History." Anne Arundel County History Notes 20 (April 1989): 1-3.
Kraus, Walter L. "Belle Chance at Andrews Air Force Base: A Piece of Maryland's Past." Maryland Historical Magazine 83 (Fall 1988): 268-73.
Annotation / Notes: Kraus argues that Andrews has the most historic setting of any airforce base in the country. He then goes on to discuss the history of the ownership of the land and the history of Belle Chance, a house on base.
Pogue, Dennis J. King's Reach and 17th-Century Plantation Life. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical and Cultural Publications, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the archeological digs at King's Reach and what the findings tell of life at the time, focussing on what can be learned of the plantation's physical layout.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Robbins, Charles L. "Seventeenth Century Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 62 (Fall 1994): 159-74.
Shomette, Donald. London Town: A Brief History. Londontown, MD: London Town Public House Commission, Inc., 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Londontown, located on the South River, was a very early example of successful town planning in Maryland. The community, however, did not have any long term success due to its economic base in the tobacco system.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Neiman, Fraser Duff. An Evolutionary Approach to Archaeological Inference: Aspects of Architectural Variation in the 17th-Century Chesapeake. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1990.
Riley, Edward M. "The Virginia Colonial Records Project." National Genealogical Society Quarterly 51 (1963): 81-89.
Forman, Henry C. "The St. Mary's City 'Castle,' Predecessor of the Williamsburg 'Palace'." William and Mary Quarterly, series 2, 12 (April 1942): 136-43.
Lyttleton, James. "The Manor Houses of the 1st Lord Baltimore in an English Atlantic World." Post-Medieval Archaeology, 51 (no. 1, 2017): 43-61.