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Morgan, Kenneth. "Slave Sales in Colonial Charleston." English Historical Review 113 (September 1998): 905-27.
Nevile, Barry, and Edward Jones. "Slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, 1688-1766." Maryland Historical Magazine 89 (Fall 1994): 319-27.
Annotation / Notes: The authors examine slavery in Worcester County, Maryland, before the American Revolution, in order to paint a different picture of slavery than that which is portrayed in popular culture, the large, gang-labor-based institution of the cotton South. Ultimately, the authors set out to identify changing patterns of slaveholding in the county before the Revolution. The increase in the use of slaves corresponded with the decline in the use of indentured servants.
Sharrer, George Terry. Slaveholding in Maryland, 1695-1775. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1968.
Sutherland, Hunter. "Slavery in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 35 (Winter 1988): 19-27.
Wax, Darold D. "Black Immigrants: The Slave Trade in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (March 1978): 30-45.
Boyd, Thomas Hulings Stockton. The History of Montgomery County, Maryland, from its earliest settlement in 1650 to 1879. Clarksburgh, MD [Baltimore, W. K. Boyle & son, printers], 1879; reprint, Baltimore: Regional Pub. Co, 1968.
Annotation / Notes: Written following the American, and the County's, Centennial, this work places special emphasis on land grants and prominent men. Includes a directory of the towns, villages, and residents.
Browne, Gary L. "Milling, Mining and Milking: The Evolution of Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 48 (Spring 1991): 46-54.
Browne, Gary L. "Urban Centers of the Past." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Fall 1984): 6-7.
Annotation / Notes: A variety of factors effect the rise and fall of urban centers -- transportation, market, environmental, and political changes, as well as the rise of other centers. Browne presents a brief discussion of the fate of approximately ten urban centers.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Fox, Jeanette L. "The Settlement of Wickliff's Creek." Chronicles of St. Mary's 31 (September 1983): 81-88.
Annotation / Notes: Wickliff's Creek was an unusual community of freeholds in a colony of largely manorial landholdings. Due to the nature of freeholding, the early settlers were able to be economically successful and politically active, however, the nature of the community, which allowed the landowners to become successful with little, if any, initial backing, limited expansion, kept the community from growing and most settlers emigrated.
Mackie, Norman Vardney, III. "Gravestone Procurement in St. Mary's County, 1634-1820." Maryland Historical Magazine 83 (Fall 1988): 229-40.
Annotation / Notes: Thirteen cemeteries were evaluated in this study which demonstrates the socio-economic data that can be compiled from the use and construction type of gravestones. The raw materials of the stones, their style, and the distribution of the stones can all be evaluated and the economic condition of the time deduced. For example, as more prosperous wheat growing farmers populated the area more money was spent on permanent markers. Also, as sandstone became available in the county more tombstone carvers were able to work in the area.
Risjord, Norman K. Builders of Annapolis: Enterprise and Politics in a Colonial Capital. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: A history of colonial Annpolis presented through the lives of eleven prominent citizens. Represented are a printer, a governor, a doctor, and a cabinetmaker. Included are such well known Maryland surnames as Carroll, Paca, Dulany, Chase, and Shaw.
Robbins, Charles L. "Seventeenth Century Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 62 (Fall 1994): 159-74.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "The Town of Herrington, c. 1667-c. 1700." Anne Arundel County History Notes 29 (July 1998): 1-2, 9-12.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "The Town of Herrington, c.1667-c.1700." Calvert Historian 13 (Spring 1998): 45-61.
Annotation / Notes: Same article as in Anne Arundel County History Notes.
Thomas, Joseph Brown, Jr. Settlement, Community, and Economy: The Development of Towns in Maryland's Lower Eastern Shore, 1660-1775. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Thomas argues that the seventeen clustered settlements that dotted the lower Eastern Shore actually functioned as towns. Although legislatively established they have been largely ignored in the history of the Chesapeake region. Most historians argue that the area was rural, when in fact its character was between urban and rural.
Towers, Frank Harold. Ruffians on the Urban Border: Labor, Politics, and Race in Baltimore, 1850-1861. Ph.D. diss., University of California, Irvine, 1993.
Abbott, Collaner M. "Colonial Copper Mines." William and Mary Quarterly 27 (1970): 295-309.
Miller, Henry M. "Transforming a 'Splendid and Delightsome Land:' Colonists and Ecological Change in the Chesapeake, 1670 - 1820." Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences 76 (September 1986): 173-87.
Price, Jacob M. "The Maryland Bank Stock Case: British-American Financial and Political Relations Before and After the American Revolution." In Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 3-40. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
Price, Jacob M. "Practices in Maryland, 1681-1837." Journal of the Early Republic 19 (Spring 1999): 15-42.
Annotation / Notes: A case study of Maryland as colony and state to determine why some states adopted the penitentiary earlier than others; whether the rise of the penitentiary was a revolutionary development; and whether the diverse paths to the penitentiary produced diverse forms. This study roots the development of the penitentiary in a regional and local context.
Carr, Lois Green. "Emigration and the Standard of Living: The Seventeenth Century Chesapeake." Journal of Economic History 52 (June 1992): 271-91.
Annotation / Notes: Carr contends that the experience of moving from England to the Chesapeake region of America in the seventeenth century was not simply a change of homeland, but a drastic change in lifestyle. She evaluates such factors as marriage, birth rates, life expectancy, diet, housing, working conditions and social freedoms for the English who chose to emigrate to America in that first century. Carr argues that, with the exception of diet, the standard of living may have been higher had the colonists remained in England, but in terms of economic independence and some degree of political participation, their prospects in the New World were superior.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "Changing Life Styles in Colonial St. Mary's County." Working Papers from the Regional Economic History Research Center 1 (no. 3, 1978): 73-118.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "Inventories and the Analysis of Wealth and Consumption Patterns in St. Mary's County, Maryland, 1658-1777." Historical Methods 13 (Spring 1980): 81-104.
Costello, M. Starr. "The Role of Wealth in Widowhood and Remarriage Patterns in Seventeenth Century Maryland." Chronicles of St. Mary's 28 (July 1980): 197-216.