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Ernst, Joseph A., and H. Roy. Merrens. "'Camden's Turrets Pierce the Skies!': the Urban Process in the Southern Colonies During the Eighteenth Century." William and Mary Quarterly 30 (1973): 549-574.
Annotation / Notes: The authors advance the case that the conventional view that Southern colonies were devoid of urbanization derives from a confusion of form and function, as well as size and significance. The article presents case studies of Camden, South Carolina, and Cross Creek, North Carolina, as well as examples from Virginia and Maryland, to demonstrate that towns often played an important urban function in the economy of the Southern colonies, though their examples are hardly convincing in contradicting the prevailing interpretation.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Guest, C. "The Boarding of the Dependent Poor in Colonial America." Social Service Review 63 (March 1989): 92-112.
Menard, Russell R. "From Servant to Freeholder: Status Mobility and Property Accumulation in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." William and Mary Quarterly 30 (1973): 37-64.
Terrar, Edward F. Social, Economic, and Religious Beliefs among Maryland Catholic Laboring People during the Period of the English Civil War, 1639-1660. Ph.D. diss., University of California, Los Angeles, 1991.
Barlow, Marjorie Dana, comp. Notes on Woman Printers In Colonial America and the United States 1639-1975. New York: Hroswitha Club, 1976.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Planter's Wife: The Experience of White Women in Seventeenth Century Maryland." William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series 34 (October 1977): 542-71.
Annotation / Notes: Most women coming to Maryland in the seventeenth century were indentured servants between ages eighteen and twenty-five. Hard work in the tobacco fields, late marriage, and early death awaited them. However, for the woman who survived seasoning and their period of service, the sexual imbalance let them choose her husband and seize the opportunity to become a planter's wife. She risked childbirth, bore three to four children, and hoped one or two lived to adulthood. Widows remarried quickly, and complex families were the norm.
Virta, Alan. "Two Women of Prince George's County." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 21 (October 1993): 3-4.
Bergstrom, Peter V. "Leah and Rachel Revisited: Everyday Life in the Colonial Chesapeake." Reviews in American History 12 (1984): 176-181.
Bridenbaugh, Carl. "The Old and New Societies of the Delaware Valley In the Seventeenth Century." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 100 (1976): 143-172.
Dunn, Richard S. "Quantifying the History of the Chesapeake in the Eighteenth Century." Reviews in American History 15 (1987): 563-568.
Egnal, Marc. "A Planting and Trading Society." Canadian Review of American Studies [Canada]18 (1987): 265-267.
Engerman, Stanley L. "Introduction to Special Issue on Colonial Slavery." Southern Studies 16 (1977): 347-354.
Fausz, J. Frederick. "Profits, Pelts, and Power: English Culture in the Early Chesapeake, 1620-1652." Maryland Historian 14 (1983): 14-30.
Gibb, James G. The Archaeology of Wealth: Consumer Behavior in English America. New York: Plenum, 1996.
Harris, P. M. G. "Inflation and Deflation in Early America, 1634-1860: Patterns of Change in the British American Economy." Social Science History 20 (1996): 469-505.
Hecht, Arthur. "Lead Production in Virginia During the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries." West Virginia History 25 (1964): 173-183.
Heite, Edward F. "Markets and Ports." Virginia Cavalcade 16 (1966): 29-41.
Herndon, G. Melvin. "Hemp in Colonial Virginia." Agricultural History 37 (1963): 86-93.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (1978): 236-245.
Keller, Allan. "The Catholics in Maryland." Early American Life 9 (1978): 18-21, 78-79.
Kepler, Jon. "Estimates of the Volume of Direct Shipments of Tobacco and Sugar from the Chief English Plantations to European Markets, 1620-1669." Journal of European Economic History [Italy] 28 (no. 1, 1999): 115-36.
Kingsbury, Susan Myra. The Records of the Virginia Company of London: The Court Book. Vol. 1, 1619-1622. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1905; reprint, Bowie, MD: Heritage Books, 1993.
Menard, Russell R. "Population, Economy, and Society in Seventeenth-Century Maryland."Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (1984): 71-92.