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Alpert, Jonathan L. "The Origin of Slavery in the United States: The Maryland Precedent." American Journal of Legal History 14 (1970): 189-222.
Annotation / Notes: Maryland was the "first province in English North America to recognize slavery as a matter of law" (189). Therefore, the study of Maryland is useful for historians studying how American slavery was a product of the law. Early legislation recognized the existence of slavery, for while indentured servitude and slavery co-existed, and the terms were used interchangeably, the law still distinguished between the two. "All slaves were servants but not all servants were slaves" (193). However, it wasn't until 1664 when a statue was created which established slavery as hereditary. This statute was the first law in English North American to thus establish this type of slavery, legalizing what had been de facto since 1639. The author concludes that laws reflect the attitudes of a society and the manner in which societal problems are resolved. In the case of Maryland, servant problems could be avoided by replacing indentured servitude with perpetual slavery.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Craven, Wesley Frank. White, Red, and Black: The Seventeenth-Century Virginian. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1971.
Annotation / Notes: Remains the standard multi-cultural work for the 17th century.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "The Shipley's Choice Tract; Part II: More Than Three Centuries of Fascinating History." Anne Arundel County History Notes 20 (April 1989): 1-3.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Robbins, Charles L. "Seventeenth Century Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 62 (Fall 1994): 159-74.
Walton, John M., Jr. "Prince George's Genesis." News and Notes from the Prince George's County Historical Society, 20 (August 1992): 3-4.
Fausz, J. Frederick. "Present at the 'Creation': The Chesapeake World that Greeted the Maryland Colonists." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Spring 1984): 7-20.
Annotation / Notes: Fausz examines relations between Europeans (especially the English of Maryland and Virginia) and Native Americans of the Chesapeake region in the decade immediately preceding the settlement of the Maryland colony at St. Mary's in 1634. He argues that the interaction between Englishmen and Native Americans provided the basis for tobacco cultivation and the beaver fur trade. Both paved the way for successful adaption of the early English settlers to new American conditions.
Rozbicki, Michael J. "Transplanted Ethos--Indians and the Cultural Identity of English Colonists in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Amerikastudien 28 (No. 4, 1983): 405-428.
Bridenbaugh, Carl. "The Old and New Societies of the Delaware Valley In the Seventeenth Century." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 100 (1976): 143-172.
Fausz, J. Frederick. "Profits, Pelts, and Power: English Culture in the Early Chesapeake, 1620-1652." Maryland Historian 14 (1983): 14-30.
Hoffman, Bernard G. "John Clayton's 1687 Account of The Medicinal Practices of The Virginia Indians." Ethnohistory 11 (1964): 1-40.
Jennings, Francis. "The Indian Trade of the Susquehanna Valley." Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society 110 (1966): 406-424.
Kent, Barry C. Susquehanna's Indians. Anthropological Series, no. 6. Harrisburg: Pennsylvania History and Museum Commission, 1984.
Rountree, Helen C., ed. Powhatan Foreign Relations, 1500-1722. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1993.
Rountree, Helen C. "Powhatan Indian Women: the People Captain John Smith Barely Saw." Ethnohistory 45 (1998): 1-29.
Harmon, James M. The Geographic Conditions of Contact: Native Americans, Colonists, and the Settlement Landscape of Southern Maryland, 1600-1695. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, College Park, 2001.
Rountree, Helen C., ed. Powhatan Foreign Relations, 1500-1722. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia, 1993.
Kent, Barry C. Jacob My Friend: His 17th Century Account of the Susquehannock Indians. Philadelphia: XLibris Corporation, 2004.
Thompson, Mark Lloyd. National Subjects in a Contested Colonial Space: Allegiance, Ethnicity, and Authority in the Seventeenth-Century Delaware Valley. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 2004.
Lumpkins, Aaron. "John Smith's Explorations of the Eastern Shore: A Lesson in Native Diplomacy." Shoreline, 15 (December 2008): 6-9.
Jennings, Francis. "Indians and Frontiers in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." In Early Maryland in a Wider World ed. by David B. Quinn. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1982, pp. 216-41.
Boender, Debra Ruth. Our Fires Have Nearly Gone Out: A History of Indian-White Relations on the Colonial Maryland Frontier, 1633-1776. Ph.D. diss., The University of New Mexico, 1988.
Becker, Sara. "Health Consequences of Contact on Two Seventeenth-Century Native Groups from the Mid-Atlantic Region of Maryland." International Journal of Historical Archaeology, 17 (December 2013): 713-30.