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Anderson, George M. "Growth, Civil War, and Change: The Montgomery County Agricultural Society, 1850-1876." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Winter 1991): 396-406.
Goodman, Jordan. Tobacco in History: The Cultures of Dependence. New York: Routledge, 1993.
McCauley, Donald. The Limits of Change in the Tobacco South: An Economic and Social Analysis of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1840-1860. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1973.
McCauley, Donald. "The Urban Impact on Agricultural Land Use: Farm Patterns in Prince George's County, Maryland 1860-1880." Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 228-47. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
Main, Gloria L. Tobacco Colony: Life in Early Maryland, 1650-1720. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982.
Menard, Russell R. "Farm Prices of Maryland Tobacco, 1659-1710." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 80-85.
Papenfuse, Edward C., Jr. "Planter Behavior and Economic Opportunity in a Staple Economy." Agricultural History 46 (1972): 297-311.
Annotation / Notes: Papenfuse challenges Avery Craven's "soil exhaustion" argument, and shows that after three generations, falling tobacco prices, which undermined planters' lifestyle, caused the dislocation Maryland older counties experienced. Soil exhaustion, he insists,"played an insignificant role in their fortunes before 1776." (p. 311).
Percy, David O. "Ax or Plow? Significant Colonial Landscape Alteration Rates in the Maryland and Virginia Tidewater." Agricultural History 66 (Spring 1992): 66-74.
Annotation / Notes: Soil exhaustion figured in colonial Maryland's decline, but it was wheat rather than tobacco that did the most damage. "While the ax created an unkempt appearance to the colonial landscape, it was the unwise use of the plow that eventually damaged the soil." (p. 74).
Percy, David O. "Tobacco." Maryland 26 (July/August 1994): 44.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Wiser, Vivian. "Maryland in the Early Land-Grant College Movement." Agricultural History 36 (1962): 194-199.
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Watson, Denton L. Lion in the Lobby: Clarence Mitchell, Jr.'s Struggle for the Passage of Civil Rights Laws. New York: Morrow, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: Chief lobbyist for the NAACP during the crucial decades of landmark Civil Rights legislation, Clarence Mitchell (1911-1984) was often called the "101st Senator." His wife, Juanita Jackson Mitchell, and mother-in-law, Lillie May Carroll Jackson, were leaders in the state and national NAACP. The story of his life parallels the history of the Civil Rights movement in the 20th century.
Williams, Juan. Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary. New York: Times Books, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. His rise from a modest upbringing in Baltimore is chronicled in this biography by journalist Juan Williams. Marshall's 1954 victory as the lead attorney in Brown v. Board of Education established his standing as a champion in the Civil Rights movement. Early in his career as a lawyer for the NAACP, Marshall argued the case that led to the desegregation of the University of Maryland.
Abingbade, Harrison Ola. "The Settler-African Conflicts: The Case of the Maryland Colonists and the Grebo 1840-1900." Journal of Negro History 66 (Summer 1981): 93-109.
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Adams, Marseta. "H. Rap Brown: 'Fight for your Rights.'" Calvert Historian 11 (Fall 1996): 53-67.
Aidt-Guy, Anita Louise. Persistent Maryland: Anti-slavery Activity between 1850 and 1864. Ph.D. diss., Georgetown University, 1994.
Ballard, Barbara Jean. Nineteenth-Century Theories of Race, the Concept of Correspondences, and the Images of Blacks in the Anti-slavery Writings of Douglass, Stow, and Browne. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1992.
Ballard, Barbara Jean. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. Family Resemblances: Zora Neale Hurston's Anthropological Heritage. Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1997.
Bell, Howard H. "The Negro Emigration Movement, 1849-1854: A Phase of Negro Nationalism." Phylon 20 (1959): 132-142.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.