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Acton, Lucy. "Bowling Brook Getting a New Lease on Life." Maryland Horse 57 (October 1991): 42-45.
Ameri, Amir H. "Housing Ideologies in the New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies, c. 1650-1700." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 56 (March 1997): 6-15.
Blumgart, Pamela James, et. al. At the Head of the Bay: A Cultural and Architectural History of Cecil County, Maryland. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust Press, 1996.
Brooks, Richard Oliver. Hiding Place in the Wind: The New Towns Attempt to Realize Communal Values in an Urban Society: A Case Study of Columbia, Maryland. Ph.D. Diss., Brandeis University, The Florence Heller Graduate School for Advanced Studies in Social Welfare, 1973.
Chalfant, Randolph W. "Calvert Station: Its Structure and Significance." Maryland Historical Magazine 74 (March 1979): 11-22.
Dahlhamer, Gloria. "The Miller House Speaks Eloquently of Village Life." Maryland 13 (Winter 1980): 23-26.
Annotation / Notes: House in Hagerstown.
Earle, Swepson. The Eastern Shore of Maryland: Its History, Traditions, Architecture, and Waters. Baltimore: Union Trust Co., [1930].
Earle, Swepson. Southern Maryland: Its History, Traditions, Architecture, and Waters. Baltimore: Union Trust Co., [1930].
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman. The Baltimore Book; New Views of Local History Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: An alternative look at Baltimore's history from a leftist, social activist perspective, the book includes historic photographs of the city's buildings and areas.
Ford, James Fitz Gerald. Social Planning and New Towns: The Case of Columbia, Maryland. Ph.D. Diss., University of Michigan, 1975.
Giza, Joanne, and Catherine F.Black. Great Baltimore Houses: An Architectural and Social History. Baltimore: Maclay & Associates, 1982.
Hayward, Mary Ellen. "Rowhouse: A Baltimore Style of Living." Three Centuries of Maryland Architechture, 65-79. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Historical Trust, 1982.
Miller, James Edward. "The Dowager of 33rd Street: Memorial Stadium and the Politics of Big-Time Sports in Maryland, 1954-1991." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Summer 1992): 187-200.
Miller, Mark B. Baltimore Transitions; Views of an American City in Flux. Baltimore: Pridemark, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Through historic and contemporary views of the same location, the author illustrates the dramatic effects of the automobile, the high-rise building, and other aspects of modern urban life on the Baltimore of a century ago.
Moudry, Robert M. Gardens, Houses, and People: The Planning of Roland Park, Baltimore. M. A. thesis, Cornell University, 1990.
Olson, Sherry. Baltimore: The Building of an American City. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1980.
Annotation / Notes: Geographer Olson's book, by far the most thorough illustrated history of Baltimore, is strong on geographic and commercial development, and gives less attention to the arts, including architecture. However it does feature many historic photographs of buildings and contemporary news accounts of their construction.
Allman, William G. "Bethesda Park: 'The Handsomest Park in the United States'." Montgomery County Story 34 (August 1991): 165-76.
Annotation / Notes: Amusement parks, often owned by the same individuals who controlled public transportation, encouraged the spread of development. Bethesda Park, which only existed for about five years, played such a role in Bethesda.
Anson, Melanie D. Olmsted's Sudbrook: The Making of a Community. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: Sudbrook Park is one of the few neighborhoods where Frank Law Olmsted's plan was carried out to its entirety. It is a nationally significant example of community design. It was the first, and most important, Olmsted suburb in the region.
Baker, Nancy T. "Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1730." Maryland Historical Magazine 81 (Fall 1986): 191-209.
Annotation / Notes: This study describes the first phase in Annapolis's development as an urban center. It covers the period in which the community progressed from a settlement to a city. This period was marked by three patterns of development -- the acquisition of land, a growth in the population, and the town's evolution as a market for imported goods.
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Bloom, Nicholas Dagen. Suburban Alchemy: 1960s New Towns and the Transformation of the American Dream. Ph.D. diss., Brandeis University, 1999.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Brooks, Richard O. New Towns and Communal Values: A Case Study of Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: This work is the product of the consultancy year the author spent with the Rouse Company. He includes a snapshot of residents at the time, such as their population characteristics and their reason for purchasing in Columbia. Included is a chapter on the now gone Antioch College.