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Carr, Lois Green, Russell R. Menard, and Lorena S. Walsh. Robert Cole's World: Agriculture and Society in Early Maryland. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1991.
Clifton, Ronald Dillard. Forms and Patterns: Room Specialization in Maryland, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania Family Dwellings, 1725-1834. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1971.
Gagliardo, John G. "Germans and Agriculture in Colonial Pennsylvania." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 83 (1959): 192-218.
Main, Gloria L. Tobacco Colony: Life in Early Maryland, 1650-1720. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1982.
Menard, Russell R. "Farm Prices of Maryland Tobacco, 1659-1710." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 80-85.
Percy, David O. "Ax or Plow? Significant Colonial Landscape Alteration Rates in the Maryland and Virginia Tidewater." Agricultural History 66 (Spring 1992): 66-74.
Annotation / Notes: Soil exhaustion figured in colonial Maryland's decline, but it was wheat rather than tobacco that did the most damage. "While the ax created an unkempt appearance to the colonial landscape, it was the unwise use of the plow that eventually damaged the soil." (p. 74).
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Wiser, Vivian. "The Thomas Cresap Story." Glades Star 7 (September 1995): 614-17.
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davidson, Thomas E. "Free Blacks in Old Somerset County, 1745-1755." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 151-156.
Annotation / Notes: County court records of Somerset County, Maryland during the eighteenth century are particularly complete, allowing for detailed studies of the county's population during that period. The author contributes to the scholarship which, up until 1985, focused primarily on the origins of black culture on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in the seventeenth century. The author also adds to the growing scholarship on free blacks in this region, which tended to also focus on the seventeenth century. In addition to examining court records to determine the numbers of free Negroes and mulattoes, the author also attempts to determine how members of these populations obtained their free status, that is, through manumission or the as the result of being children of free mothers (free-born).
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Eltis, David. The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Fletcher, William Joseph. The Contribution of the Faculty of Saint Mary's Seminary to the Solution of Baltimore's San Domingan Negro Problems, 1793-1852. M.A. thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1951.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Fowler, David Henry. "Freedom Fettered - Blacks and the Constitutional Era in Maryland 1776-1810." Maryland Pendulum (Special Issue 1987): 1-12.
Annotation / Notes: Summaries of papers presented at a conference at Morgan State University, October 1987.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Hicks, Helena S. The Black Apprentice in Maryland Court Records from 1661 to 1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the apprenticeship system in Maryland as related to blacks during the period 1661 to 1865. For blacks in Maryland, apprenticeship was one of the earliest forms of education available. Court records are used to examine Maryland's apprenticeship system. Although Maryland's apprenticeship law of 1793 eliminated the reading and writing requirement for apprentices in the case of black apprentices, black apprentices' contracts still contained literacy provisions. Employment in various trade was another benefit resulting from the apprenticeship system.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Klein, Mary O. "'We Shall Be Accountable to God:' Some Inquiries into the Position of Blacks in Somerset Parish, Maryland, 1692-1865." Maryland Historical Magazine 87 (Winter 1992): 399-406.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the conversion of free blacks and slaves in Somerset Parish. While a 1664 Maryland law stated that baptism had no effect on the status of a slave, the Anglican church worked towards conversion of the enslaved. However, Christian education and baptism varied depending on individual slaveowners. In some cases, the enslaved themselves refused to be baptized. Evidence of African religious practices remained alongside the practice of Christianity.
Kulikoff, Allan. "The Origins of Afro-American Society in Tidewater Maryland and Virginia, 1700 to 1790." William and Mary Quarterly 35 (April 1978): 226-59.
Annotation / Notes: The author argues that enslaved blacks living in Tidewater Maryland and Virginia during the eighteenth century developed their own community life, in order to disprove the notion that the enslaved were forced to accept Anglo-American beliefs and values without question. The author examines the process of creating Afro-American culture in these tidewater regions. He concludes that the development of Afro-American communities did not take place until the middle of the eighteenth century, a much slower process of development than that which took place in the West Indies.
Kulikoff, Allan. "A 'Prolifick' People: Black Population Growth in the Chesapeake Colonies, 1700-1790." Southern Studies 16 (Winter 1977): 391-428.
Annotation / Notes: The author attempts to document the population growth of Africans and African-Americans between 1660 and 1780. The population grew due to forced immigration or from natural increase. Natural increase helped the founding of enslaved communities and helped in the establishment of kinship systems.