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Charbeneau, Jim. Shouts and Whispers: Stories from the Southern Chesapeake Bay. White Stone, VA: Brandylane Publishers, 1997.
Manchester, William Raymond. Disturber of the Peace: The Life and Times of H. L. Mencken. New York: Harper, 1951; revised edition. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1986.
Rodgers, Marion Elizabeth, ed. Mencken and Sara, A Life in Letters: The Private Correspondence of H. L. Mencken and Sara Haardt. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1987.
Ballard, Barbara Jean. Nineteenth-Century Theories of Race, the Concept of Correspondences, and the Images of Blacks in the Anti-slavery Writings of Douglass, Stow, and Browne. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1992.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. Family Resemblances: Zora Neale Hurston's Anthropological Heritage. Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1997.
Blight, David W. "Up from 'Twoness:' Frederick Douglass and the Meaning of W. E. B. Dubois's Concept of Double Consciousness." Canadian Review of American Studies 21 (Winter 1990): 301-19.
Brock, W. R. "Race and the American Past: a Revolution in Historiography." History [Great Britain] 52 (1967): 49-59.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Contee, Clarence G. The American Negro as Portrayed by the Baltimore Sun: 1901-1904. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1953.
Fehrenbacker, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Most important case of Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from Maryland.
Gibson, Donald B. "Christianity and Individualism: (Re-) Creation and Reality in Frederick Douglass's Representation of Self." African American Review 26 (Winter 1992): 591-603.
Goldstein, Leslie F. "Violence as an Instrument for Social Change: The Views of Frederick Douglass, 1819-1895." Journal of Negro History 41 (January 1976): 61-72.
Hajdusiewicz, Babs Bell. Mary Carter Smith: African-American Storyteller. Springfield, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 1995.
Howard-Pitney, David. "Wars, White America, and the Afro-American Jeremiad: Frederick Douglass and Martin Luther King, Jr." Journal of Negro History 71 (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall 1986): 23-37.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Jordan, William George. 'Getting America Told:' The Black Press and its Dialogue with White America, 1914-1919. Ph.D. diss., University of New Hampshire, 1996.
Jordan, Winthrop. White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1968.
Quarles, Benjamin. "Frederick Douglass: Bridge-builder in Human Relations." Negro History Bulletin 29 (1966): 99-100, 112.
Trefzer, Annette. "'Let us all be Kissing-Friends?' Zora Neale Hurston and Race Politics in Dixie." Journal of American Studies [Cambridge] 31 (April 1997): 69-78.
Wax, Darold D. "The Image of the Negro in the 'Maryland Gazette,' 1745-75." Journalism Quarterly 46 (1969): 73-80.
Cook, Eleanor M. V. "Life in Montgomery County at the Turn of the Last Century." Montgomery County Story 42 (November 1999): 101-12.
Mellin, Jack. "Green Haven Advertising Brochures." Anne Arundel County History Notes 22 (January 1991): 9; (April 1991): 9-10.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Olesker, Michael. Michael Olesker's Baltimore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: Selection of columns from the News American and Baltimore Sun, covering the years 1979-1994. His topics include politicians, sports, eccentrics. He presents a loving picture of Baltimore during the last quarter of the twentieth century without overlooking the problems, such as crime, drugs, and poverty, which plague the city.