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Anderson, George M. "Growth, Civil War, and Change: The Montgomery County Agricultural Society, 1850-1876." Maryland Historical Magazine 86 (Winter 1991): 396-406.
Agle, Anna Bradford, and Sidney Hovey Wanzer, eds. "Dearest Braddie: Love and War in Maryland, 1860-61, Part 2." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 337-58.
Billingsley, Andrew. "Family Reunion-The Legacy of Robert Smalls: Civil War Hero." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1993): 14-17.
Blackburn, George M., ed. "The Negro as Viewed by a Michigan Civil War Soldier: Letters of John C. Buchanan." Michigan History 47 (1963): 75-84.
Blassingame, John Wesley. The Organization and Use of Negro Troops in the Union Army, 1863-1865. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1961.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Garrant, Richard Louis. Racial Minority Understanding and Awareness Educational Programs in the Ft. G. G. Meade, Maryland Community. Ed.D. diss., George Washington University, 1986.
George, Christopher T. "Mirage of Freedom: African Americans in the War of 1812." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Winter 1996): 426-50.
Annotation / Notes: Black men fought for both the American and British forces during the War of 1812. For example, free blacks who constructed earthworks and black sailors in the U.S. Navy helped to deflect the British attack on Baltimore in 1814. Free blacks and slaves who decided to help the British hoped to secure freedom in return for their services.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Dombrowski, Esther. Dundalk, Then & Now 1894-1980. Dundalk, MD: Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, 1980.
Mullinix, Elsie Wingate, ed. Severna Park Reflections: An Album of Memories. Severna Park, MD: Severna Park Old Timers, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: The Severna Park Old Timers are individuals who lived in the area prior to the 1950s, before the construction of Ritchie Highway. The reflections consist of over 150 written recollections, many with accompanying photographs, by this group of people on a wide variety of topics, including education, local organizations, homes, etc.
Musey, Reuben L. It Happened in Washington County. Hagerstown, MD: Washington County Bicentennial Committee, 1976.
Copeland, David. "'Join or Die:' America's Newspapers in the French and Indian War." Journalism History 24 (Autumn 1998): 112-21.
Leventhal, Herbert, and James E. Mooney. "A Bibliography of Loyalist Source Material in the United States." Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society 85 (1975): 73-308, 405-460.
Leventhal, Herbert, and James E. Mooney. "Old Clear Spring Library Remembered." Maryland Cracker Barrel (Dec. 1999/Jan 2000): 26, 28.
Annotation / Notes: The small, volunteer run, Clear Spring Library developed in a building which had served as a community kitchen and a soldier's canteen. The library existed only between the two great wars. This brief history is compiled from the quotes of community members.
Requardt, Cynthia Horsburgh. "Women's Deeds in Women's Words: Manuscripts in the Maryland Historical Society." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (June 1978): 186-204.
Crowl, Philip A. "Maryland during and after the Revolution: A Political and Economic Study." Johns Hopkins University Studies 61 (1943).
Lee, Jean B. The Price of Nationhood: The American Revolution in Charles County. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 1994.
Annotation / Notes: This intensive and insightful study of a single county offers insight into several large themes in Maryland history - "the American Revolution as a transforming, ongoing phenomenon, civilian's responses to the War for Independence, the tenor of the nation's formative years, and the nature of Chesapeake society." During this period Charles Country changed from prosperous economy, securely connected to the outside world through overseas trade, into a stagnant backwater, whose forward looking population searched for opportunity elsewhere. Unlike other areas of Maryland, where the Revolutionary years were tumultuous, there were few challenges to the status quo. Cut off from the empire, entrepreneurial whites left the county in search of wealth and opportunity, often as close as Washington, DC, and the population became overwhelmingly unfree.
Cole, Merle T. "Racing Real Estate, and Realpolitik: The Havre De Grace State Military Reservation." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Fall 1996): 328-46.
Kanarek, Harold. The Mid-Atlantic Engineers: A History of the Baltimore District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1774-1974. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, [1978?].
Annotation / Notes: The Baltimore harbor and shipping and Maryland's internal improvements are covered.
Stuart, Charles B. Lives and Works of Civil and Military Engineers of America. New York: Van Nostrand, 1871.
Annotation / Notes: Because of the National Road, the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, Maryland was a training ground for the nation's 19th century civil engineers and bridge designers. Stuart's book, though dated, has chapters on several nationally-important individuals who learned their trade on one of more of these state public works.
Addison-Darneille, and Henrietta Stockton. "For Better or For Worse." Civil War Times Illustrated 31 (May/June 1992): 32-35, 73.