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Otter, William. History of My Own Times or, the Life and Adventures of William Otter, Sen. Comprising a Series of Events, and Musical Incidents Altogether Original. Emmitsburg, MD: n.p., 1835; reprint. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1995.
Annotation / Notes: William Otter (1787-1856) has left an entertaining autobiography of his life as a plasterer and practical jokester. Originally published in Emmitsburg in 1835, Otter's History offers an unusual glimpse into social history from an artisan's perspective. Whether Otter's humorous adventures and anecdotes are all true is debatable. His story does, however, suggest a continuation of the irreverent Maryland personality seen in the works of Ebenezer Cooke, Dr. Alexander Hamilton and Meshack Browning.
Goosman, Stuart L. The Social and Cultural Organization of Black Group Vocal Harmony in Washington, D. C. and Baltimore, Maryland, 1945-1960. Ph.D. diss., University of Washington, 1992.
Cross, E. May. "The Patent Medicine Show and Other Events at Rayville." History Trails 33 (Spring 1999): 9-12.
Hooper, Anne B. Braddock Heights: A Glimpse Backward. Published by the author, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: Braddock's history during its years as a major resort. Included are local legends and recipes. The second half of the book is a walking tour.
Love, Mary I. "'The Mountain Chautauqua': Mountain Lake Park 1881-1941." Glades Star 5 (March 1982): 385-401; (September 1982): 434-35.
Merrill, Philip J., and Uluaipou-O-Malo Aiono. Baltimore. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 1999.
Annotation / Notes: Part of Arcadia's Black America Series, this photohistory, which uses a variety of graphic materials, gives a visual introduction to Baltimore as documented through the lives of its black citizens. Many of the photographs are the work of black photographers.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Barnett, David. "'Maryland,' The Movie." Maryland 21 (Spring 1989): 69.
Cissel, Anne W. "Public Houses of Entertainment and their Proprietors, 1750-1828." Montgomery County Story 30 (August 1987): 279-94.
Click, Patricia C. The Spirit of the Times: Amusements in Nineteenth-Century Baltimore, Norfolk, and Richmond. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: This author expertly interweaves a detailed description of work habits, living arrangements, economics, and class structure with the question of what people did for fun. Around 1800 a variety of public entertainments included music, drama, presentational dancing, feats of dexterity and other spectacular offerings -these were held at theatres, circuses, taverns, and pleasure gardens. As the century progressed amusements became increasingly specialized and stratified, serving people of differing economic means, political leanings, and ethnic/religious backgrounds.
David, Jonathan Comly. On One Accord: Community, Musicality, and Spirit among the Singing and Praying Bands of Tidewater Maryland and Delaware. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1994.
Dowell, Susan Stiles. "Easton's Avalon Theatre: A Dream Reborn." Maryland 22 (Summer 1990): 42-47.
Heintze, James R. "Alexander Malcolm: Musician, Clergyman, and Schoolmaster." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 226-35.
Kelbaugh, Jack. "The Star: Anne Arundel's Only Black Movie Theater." Anne Arundel County History Notes 31 (October 1999): 3-4, 9.
Kracke, Robert D., and Carol Bench. "Through the Cracks of History: Those Shape Notes." Harford Historical Bulletin (Summer 1984): 38-46.
Annotation / Notes: Hymnal scores and their use in Harford County.
Levy, Lester S. "Recollections of a Sheet Music Collector." Notes 32 (March 1976): 491-502.
Lichtenwanger, William. "The Music of 'The Star-Spangled Banner': From Ludgate Hill to Capitol Hill." Quarterly Journal of the Library of Congress 34 (July 1977): 136-70.
Preston, Katherine K. Opera on the Road: Traveling Opera Troupes in the United States, 1825-60. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press, 1993.
Ritchey, David. "Columbia Garden: Baltimore's First Pleasure Garden." Southern Speech Communication Journal 39 (1974): 241-247.
Shifflet, Anne Louise. Church Music and Musical Life in Frederick, Maryland 1745-1845. M.A. thesis, American University, 1971.
Somerville, Atwell Wilson, Jr. The Tuesday Club of Annapolis (1745-1756) as Cultural Theater. Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1992.
Spencer, William B. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, 1965-1982: The Meyerhoff Years. D.M.A. diss., Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Spencer's dissertation examines the remarkable growth of the orchestra during Joseph Meyerhoff's tenure as chairman of the orchestra's board of trustees. Drawing on the orchestra's extensive historical records, oral history interviews and archival documents at Maryland Historical Society, the Peabody Archives and Pratt's Maryland Room, Spencer paints a vibrant portrait of an orchestra in transition and the struggle to build a performance hall. Union negotiations, race-relations, management strategies, and the changing image of the orchestra are reviewed in depth. Spencer enlivens his text with back-stage stories from musicians and former conductors.
Weems, Helen R. The History of the Women's String Orchestra. M.M. thesis, Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University, Peabody Conservatory of Music, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: The Women's String Orchestra was organized in 1936 to provide performance opportunities to women musicians barred from the all-male Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The orchestra, which numbered between 35 to 40 players, performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Cadoa Hall and the Peabody. Less than two months after the debut of the Women's String Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony opened its auditions to women (five of the women string players were hired). Weems' thesis examines the public response to female orchestral musicians in Baltimore and elsewhere in the United States and the role of women in the musical life of the city in the late 1930s. Her interviews with the founding members of the orchestra provide vivid accounts of the barriers placed in the paths of these pioneering women and how they surmounted them.