Search

1-25 of 299 results
McCauley, Donald. The Limits of Change in the Tobacco South: An Economic and Social Analysis of Prince George's County, Maryland, 1840-1860. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1973.
McCauley, Donald. "The Urban Impact on Agricultural Land Use: Farm Patterns in Prince George's County, Maryland 1860-1880." Law, Society, and Politics in Early Maryland. Edited by Aubrey C. Land, Lois Green Carr, and Edward C. Papenfuse, 228-47. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
Maryland Department of Agriculture. Animal Health Programs in Maryland, 1880-1986. Annapolis, MD: Maryland Department of Agriculture, 1990.
Stevenson, John A. "Plants, Problems, and Personalities: The Genesis of the Bureau of Plant Industry." Agricultural History 28 (1954): 155-162.
Annotation / Notes: Nearly as much a history of plant pathology in the U. S., this piece describes how Beverly T. Galloway conducted research that convinced politicians and farmers alike that germs caused diseases of animals and plants. Galloway succeeded in raising the status of plant research in the U. S. D. A. from a tiny office to the Bureau of Plant Industry in 1901, which became the nucleus for the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center.
Wiser, Vivian. "Maryland in the Early Land-Grant College Movement." Agricultural History 36 (1962): 194-199.
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Leder, Drew. The Soul Knows No Bars: Inmates Reflect on Life, Death and Hope. Rowman and Littlefield, 2000.
Thomas, Evan. The Man to See: Edward Bennett Williams, Legendary Lawyer, Ultimate Insider. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1991.
Watson, Denton L. Lion in the Lobby: Clarence Mitchell, Jr.'s Struggle for the Passage of Civil Rights Laws. New York: Morrow, 1990.
Annotation / Notes: Chief lobbyist for the NAACP during the crucial decades of landmark Civil Rights legislation, Clarence Mitchell (1911-1984) was often called the "101st Senator." His wife, Juanita Jackson Mitchell, and mother-in-law, Lillie May Carroll Jackson, were leaders in the state and national NAACP. The story of his life parallels the history of the Civil Rights movement in the 20th century.
Williams, Juan. Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary. New York: Times Books, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Thurgood Marshall was the first African American to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court. His rise from a modest upbringing in Baltimore is chronicled in this biography by journalist Juan Williams. Marshall's 1954 victory as the lead attorney in Brown v. Board of Education established his standing as a champion in the Civil Rights movement. Early in his career as a lawyer for the NAACP, Marshall argued the case that led to the desegregation of the University of Maryland.
Abingbade, Harrison Ola. "The Settler-African Conflicts: The Case of the Maryland Colonists and the Grebo 1840-1900." Journal of Negro History 66 (Summer 1981): 93-109.
Adams, Marseta. "H. Rap Brown: 'Fight for your Rights.'" Calvert Historian 11 (Fall 1996): 53-67.
Aidt-Guy, Anita Louise. Persistent Maryland: Anti-slavery Activity between 1850 and 1864. Ph.D. diss., Georgetown University, 1994.
Aidt-Guy, Anita Louise. "Baltimore: What Went Wrong?" Black Enterprise Magazine 2 (November 1971): 40-48.
Barnett, Todd Harold. The Evolution of 'North' and 'South:' Settlement and Slavery on America's Sectional Border, 1650-1810. Ph.D. diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1993.
Bell, Howard H. "The Negro Emigration Movement, 1849-1854: A Phase of Negro Nationalism." Phylon 20 (1959): 132-142.
Berlin, Ira. Many Thousands Gone: The First Two Centuries of Slavery in North America. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1998.
Berlin, Ira. Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South. New York: Pantheon Books, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: The author spends some time discussing Maryland, and the Upper South in general, in order to emphasize geographic distinctions which impacted the status of free Negroes. He postulates that the treatment and status of free blacks foreshadowed the treatment of black people in general after emancipation. In addition, the author examines the various classes of free blacks to understand how different groups viewed their social role. For the elite, positions of leadership continued after the Civil War. Maryland is of particular interest since by 1810, almost one-quarter of Maryland's black population was free. Maryland therefore had the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Bogen, David Skillen. "The First Integration of the University of Maryland School of Law." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 39-49.
Borome, Joseph A. "The Vigilant Committee of Philadelphia." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 92 (1968): 320-351.
Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Bridner, Elwood L., Jr. The Mason-Dixon Line and the Fugitive Slave. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1966.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.