Search

1-25 of 201 results
Frasseto, Claude B. Betsy Bonaparte, ou la Belle de Baltimore. [France]: J.C. Lattes, 1988.
Martin, Ralph G. The Woman He Loved: The Story of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1974.
Adams, E. J. "Religion and Freedom: Artifacts Indicate that African Culture Persisted Even in Slavery." Omni 16 (November 1993): 8.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. Family Resemblances: Zora Neale Hurston's Anthropological Heritage. Ph.D. diss., Princeton University, 1997.
Basalla, Susan Elizabeth. "Dr. Lillie M. Jackson: Lifelong Freedom Fighter." Crisis 82 (1975): 297-299.
Driggs, Margaret Barton. "They Called Her Moses: Harriet Tubman." Maryland 13 (Summer 1980): 20-23.
Foeman, Anita K. "Gloria Richardson: Breaking the Mold." Journal of Black Studies 26, no. 5 (1996): 604-15.
Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Johansen, Mary Carroll. "'Intelligence, Though Overlooked:' Education for Black Women in the Upper South, 1800-1840." Maryland Historical Magazine 93 (Winter 1998): 443-65.
Annotation / Notes: Black and white educators established forty-six schools for free black children in the early nineteenth century. These educators supported education for black women believing that women transmitted knowledge and morals, thus shaping a generation of virtuous citizens. In addition, educators looked to education as a means by which to form self-sufficient and industrious free black communities.
Morrow, Diane Batts. The Oblate Sisters of Providence: Issues of Black and Female Agency in their Antebellum Experience, 1828-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1996.
Terborg-Penn, Rosalyn. "Black Women Freedom Fighters in Early 19th Century Maryland." Maryland Heritage News 2 (Spring 1984): 11-12.
Welcome, Verda F., as told to James M. Abraham. My Life and Times. Englewood, NJ: Henry House Publishers, 1991.
Anderson, George M. "The Civil War Courtship of Richard Mortimer Williams and Rose Anderson of Rockville." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 119-138.
Annotation / Notes: The story of the couple's courtship taken from Williams's writings. Insight is offered into life in Rockville, the county seat, during that period.
Darin, Grace. "The Story of Charles Village: The Building of a Community (1967-1974)." In Charles Village Journal, 6-18. Baltimore: Charles Village Civic Association, 1974.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Forman, Henry Chandlee. The Rolling Year on Maryland's Upper Eastern Shore. Centreville, MD: Corsica Bookshop, 1985.
Gray, Ralph D., and Gerald E. Hartdagen. "A Glimpse of Baltimore Society in 1827: Letters by Henry D. Gilpin." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 256-70.
Annotation / Notes: Gilpin, a young lawyer from Philadelphia, wrote five lengthy letters to his father while visiting the Baltimore area in September, 1827. He described the people he met, many of whom were very important in Baltimore society, many were also the family and associates of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. In these letters he presents an insightful view of the life of the area's upper class. Of special interest is his descriptions of the major houses of Doughoregan Manor, Homewood, and Oakland.
Guy, Mrs. Bernard. "Bloomington's Civic Club." Glades Star 5 (September 1979): 170-73, 190.
Lumpkins, Maggie Henderson. "Memories of St. George Island." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 104-6.
Nast, Leonara Heilig, Laurence N. Krause, and R. C. Monk, eds. Baltimore. A Living Renaissance. Baltimore: Historic Baltimore Society, Inc., 1982.
Annotation / Notes: An eclectic mix of over eighty essays, authored by a broad spectrum of individuals, on topics that illustrate the renaissance that Baltimore experienced during the 1960s and 1970s. Organized under such broad topics as "Baltimore Builds","Social Perspective","The Arts", and "What Makes Baltimore Baltimore" the broad range of subjects covered include Baltimore night life, public housing, television and radio, football, aging services, and influential political and community figures. Includes a brief chronology of the City's redevelopment, 1937-1981.
Sween, Jane C. "An Englishwoman Visits Montgomery County in 1830." Montgomery County Story 40 (August 1997): 441-52.
Cameron, Mark. "Monuments of Urbanity: The Development of Baltimore's Residential Squares." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1998): 5.