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Berlin, Ira. Slaves Without Masters: The Free Negro in the Antebellum South. New York: Pantheon Books, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: The author spends some time discussing Maryland, and the Upper South in general, in order to emphasize geographic distinctions which impacted the status of free Negroes. He postulates that the treatment and status of free blacks foreshadowed the treatment of black people in general after emancipation. In addition, the author examines the various classes of free blacks to understand how different groups viewed their social role. For the elite, positions of leadership continued after the Civil War. Maryland is of particular interest since by 1810, almost one-quarter of Maryland's black population was free. Maryland therefore had the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Billingsley, Andrew. "Family Reunion-The Legacy of Robert Smalls: Civil War Hero." Maryland Humanities (Winter 1993): 14-17.
Blackburn, George M., ed. "The Negro as Viewed by a Michigan Civil War Soldier: Letters of John C. Buchanan." Michigan History 47 (1963): 75-84.
Blassingame, John Wesley. The Organization and Use of Negro Troops in the Union Army, 1863-1865. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1961.
Blassingame, John W. "'Soul' or Scholarship: An Examination of Black Studies So Far; What Students Learn about History." Smithsonian 1 (1970): 58-64.
Blight, David W. Frederick Douglass' Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Blight, David W. "Up from 'Twoness:' Frederick Douglass and the Meaning of W. E. B. Dubois's Concept of Double Consciousness." Canadian Review of American Studies 21 (Winter 1990): 301-19.
Bogen, David Skillen. "The First Integration of the University of Maryland School of Law." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 39-49.
Borome, Joseph A. "The Vigilant Committee of Philadelphia." Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 92 (1968): 320-351.
Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Bradley, Gladyce H. "Friendships among Students in Desegregated Schools." Journal of Negro Education 33 (1964): 90-92.
Bridner, Elwood L., Jr. "The Fugitive Slaves of Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 33-50.
Bridner, Elwood L., Jr. The Mason-Dixon Line and the Fugitive Slave. M.A. thesis, University of Maryland, 1966.
Brock, W. R. "Race and the American Past: a Revolution in Historiography." History [Great Britain] 52 (1967): 49-59.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Buford, Carolyn Bames. The Distribution of Negroes in Maryland, 1850-1950. M.A. thesis, Catholic University, 1955.
Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Calderhead, William. "How Extensive Was the Border State Slave Trade? A New Look." Civil War History 18 (1972): 42-55.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Inventory of a Maryland Slave Cabin." Riversdale Letter 12 (Spring 1995): 2-4.
Callcott, Margaret Law. The Negro in Maryland Politics, 1870-1912. Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina, 1967.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines how Maryland was an exception to the history of disfranchisement following Reconstruction. Black men in Maryland exercised the right to vote with relative freedom. Black voter participation was consistently about equal to that of whites. Maryland therefore provides an opportunity to study black political participation, and the effects of black suffrage on the party system and policies in Maryland during this time.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Slave and Slave Families at Riversdale." Riversdale Letter 13 (Fall 1996): 2-5.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Slave Housing at Riversdale." Riversdale Letter 11 (Fall 1994): 2-4.
Campbell, Penelope. Maryland in Africa: The Maryland State Colonization Society, 1831-1857. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1971.
Clark, Alex Rees. "Selected Demographic Components of the Non-White Population of Baltimore: A Comment." Middle Atlantic 6 (July 1975): 75-82.
Annotation / Notes: 1960-70.
Cochran, Matthew D. "Hoodoo's Fire: Interpreting Nineteenth Century African American Material Culture at the Brice House, Annapolis, Maryland." Maryland Archeology 35 (March 1999): 25-33.