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Contee, Clarence G. The American Negro as Portrayed by the Baltimore Sun: 1901-1904. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1953.
Cornelison, Alice. "History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland." Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society 10 (Summer-Fall 1989): 117-19.
Cornelison, Alice, Silas E. Craft, Sr., and Lillie Price. History of Blacks in Howard County, Maryland: Oral History, Schooling and Contemporary Issues. Columbia, MD: Howard County, Maryland NAACP, 1986.
Davidson, Thomas E. "Free Blacks in Old Somerset County, 1745-1755." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Summer 1985): 151-156.
Annotation / Notes: County court records of Somerset County, Maryland during the eighteenth century are particularly complete, allowing for detailed studies of the county's population during that period. The author contributes to the scholarship which, up until 1985, focused primarily on the origins of black culture on the Eastern Shore of Maryland in the seventeenth century. The author also adds to the growing scholarship on free blacks in this region, which tended to also focus on the seventeenth century. In addition to examining court records to determine the numbers of free Negroes and mulattoes, the author also attempts to determine how members of these populations obtained their free status, that is, through manumission or the as the result of being children of free mothers (free-born).
Della, M. Ray, Jr. "An Analysis of Baltimore's Population in the 1850's." Maryland Historical Magazine 68 (1973): 20-35.
Dessaint, A. Y. "Black Culture in Early 20th-Century Calvert County." Calvert County Historical Society News and Notes 2 (October 1983): 10-19.
Diggs, Louis S. In Our Voices: A Folk History in Legacy. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 1998.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Diggs, Louis S. "Dr. Lillie M. Jackson: Lifelong Freedom Fighter." Crisis 82 (1975): 297-299.
Driggs, Margaret Barton. "They Called Her Moses: Harriet Tubman." Maryland 13 (Summer 1980): 20-23.
Driggs, Margaret Barton. "Early Ordinations of Black Preachers." Third Century Methodism 31 (February 1992): 2-3.
Earp, Charles A. "The Role of Education in the Maryland Colonization Movement." Maryland Historical Magazine 26 (1941): 365-88.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Eltis, David. The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Eltis, David. "Emory Grove: A Black Community of Yesteryear." Montgomery County Story 31 (February 1988): 1-10.
Eschen, Donald Von, Jerome Kirk, and Maurice Pinard. "The Conditions of Direct Action in a Democratic Society." Western Political Quarterly 22 (1969): 309-325.
Evans, Paul Fairfax. City Life: A Perspective from Baltimore 1968-1978. Columbia, MD: C. H. Fairfax Co., 1981.
Fairley, Paul L. Desegregation Activities at Maryland's Historically Black Public Institutions for Undergraduate Higher Education. Ed.D. diss., University of Miami, 1986.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Favor, Homer Eli. The Effects of Racial Changes in Occupancy Patterns upon Property Values in Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1960.
Fehrenbacker, Don E. The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1978.
Annotation / Notes: Most important case of Roger B. Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court from Maryland.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. The Maryland Way from Slavery to Freedom. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1980.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Fletcher, William Joseph. The Contribution of the Faculty of Saint Mary's Seminary to the Solution of Baltimore's San Domingan Negro Problems, 1793-1852. M.A. thesis, The Johns Hopkins University, 1951.
Foeman, Anita K. "Gloria Richardson: Breaking the Mold." Journal of Black Studies 26, no. 5 (1996): 604-15.