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Fowler, David Henry. Northern Attitudes toward Interracial Marriage; A Study of Legislation and Public Opinion in the Middle Atlantic States and the States of the Old Northwest. Ph.D. diss., Yale University, 1963.
Fowler, David Henry. "Freedom Fettered - Blacks and the Constitutional Era in Maryland 1776-1810." Maryland Pendulum (Special Issue 1987): 1-12.
Annotation / Notes: Summaries of papers presented at a conference at Morgan State University, October 1987.
Fuke, Richard Paul. "Blacks, Whites, and Guns: Interracial Violence in Post-Emancipation Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 92 (Fall 1997): 326-47.
Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.
Gardner, Bettye J. "Opposition to Emigration, a Selected Letter of William Watkins (The Colored Baltimorean)." Journal of Negro History 47 (Summer 1982): 155-158.
Garonzik, Joseph. Urbanization and the Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1870. Ph.D. diss., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1974.
Garrant, Richard Louis. Racial Minority Understanding and Awareness Educational Programs in the Ft. G. G. Meade, Maryland Community. Ed.D. diss., George Washington University, 1986.
George, Christopher T. "Mirage of Freedom: African Americans in the War of 1812." Maryland Historical Magazine 91 (Winter 1996): 426-50.
Annotation / Notes: Black men fought for both the American and British forces during the War of 1812. For example, free blacks who constructed earthworks and black sailors in the U.S. Navy helped to deflect the British attack on Baltimore in 1814. Free blacks and slaves who decided to help the British hoped to secure freedom in return for their services.
Gibson, Donald B. "Christianity and Individualism: (Re-) Creation and Reality in Frederick Douglass's Representation of Self." African American Review 26 (Winter 1992): 591-603.
Goldin, Claudia Dale. Urban Slavery in the American South 1820-1860: A Quantitative History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Numerous references to Baltimore.
Goldstein, Leslie F. "Violence as an Instrument for Social Change: The Views of Frederick Douglass, 1819-1895." Journal of Negro History 41 (January 1976): 61-72.
Goosman, Stuart L. The Social and Cultural Organization of Black Group Vocal Harmony in Washington, D. C. and Baltimore, Maryland, 1945-1960. Ph.D. diss., University of Washington, 1992.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Groves, Paul A., and Edward K. Muller. "The Evolution of Black Residential Areas in Late Nineteenth-Century Cities." Journal of Historical Geography 1 (April 1975): 169-91.
Annotation / Notes: Includes Baltimore.
Guy, Anita Aidt. Maryland's Persistent Pursuit to End Slavery, 1850-1864. New York: Garland Pub., 1997.
Hajdusiewicz, Babs Bell. Mary Carter Smith: African-American Storyteller. Springfield, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 1995.
Hall, Robert L. "Slave Resistance in Baltimore City and County, 1747-1790." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 305-18.
Halper, Lee. "On Growing Up Black in Sandy Spring." Legacy 19 (Spring 1999): 1, 3.
Harrold, Stanley. "Freeing the Weems Family: A New Look at the Underground Railroad." Civil War History 42 (December 1996): 289-306.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines conventional and scholarly interpretations of underground railroad by looking at the escape of the Weems family from the Chesapeake region of Maryland. By using the Weems family as a case study, the author challenges thirty years' worth of scholarship on the underground railroad. By examining a family that escaped from a border state, the author is able to explore both black self-determination and white assistance found in the records of this family's escape. In addition, the author examines a bi-racial network of non-Garrisonian abolitionists who raised money to purchase the freedom of slaves, or if that was not possible, to channel the money raised into effecting an escape plan.
Harris, Kirk Edward. The Paradox of African-American Mayoral Leadership and the Persistence of Poverty in the African-American Community. Ph.D. diss., Cornell University, 1992.
Harris, William C. "James Lynch: Black Leader in Southern Reconstruction." Historian 34 (1971): 40-61.
Hart, Ethel Juanita. Negro Suffrage in Maryland. M.A. thesis, Howard University, 1934.
Hicks, Helena S. The Black Apprentice in Maryland Court Records from 1661 to 1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the apprenticeship system in Maryland as related to blacks during the period 1661 to 1865. For blacks in Maryland, apprenticeship was one of the earliest forms of education available. Court records are used to examine Maryland's apprenticeship system. Although Maryland's apprenticeship law of 1793 eliminated the reading and writing requirement for apprentices in the case of black apprentices, black apprentices' contracts still contained literacy provisions. Employment in various trade was another benefit resulting from the apprenticeship system.
Hodes, Michael C. "Kweisi Mfume." Maryland 29 (January/February 1997): 16-19, 59.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.