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26-50 of 76 results
Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Weimer, Linda G. "Maryland Seafood Farmers." Maryland 24 (Winter 1991): 14-21.
Wiser, Vivian. "Maryland in the Early Land-Grant College Movement." Agricultural History 36 (1962): 194-199.
Wiser, Vivian. The Movement for Agricultural Improvement in Maryland, 1785-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 1963.
Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1986.
De Gast, Robert. Unreal Estate: The Eastern Shore. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993.
Annotation / Notes: Photo study of a variety of abandoned buildings -- agricultural structures and homes.
Dessaint, A. Y. Southern Maryland Yesterday and Today: Crab Pots and Sotweed Fields. Prince Frederick, MD: Calvert County Historical Society, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: Historic photographs and excerpts from 60 of the "best" works on Southern Maryland. Arranged predominately by theme, the chapters include working the land, working the water, life in the home, and life in the community. A ten page introduction gives a brief chronological history of the area.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Dombrowski, Esther. Dundalk, Then & Now 1894-1980. Dundalk, MD: Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, 1980.
Fox, Jeanette L. "The Settlement of Wickliff's Creek." Chronicles of St. Mary's 31 (September 1983): 81-88.
Annotation / Notes: Wickliff's Creek was an unusual community of freeholds in a colony of largely manorial landholdings. Due to the nature of freeholding, the early settlers were able to be economically successful and politically active, however, the nature of the community, which allowed the landowners to become successful with little, if any, initial backing, limited expansion, kept the community from growing and most settlers emigrated.
Mellin, Jack. "Gambrills Ephemera (Part III)." Anne Arundel County History Notes 26 (April 1995): 7, 16; Part IV, (July 1995): 7, 14.
White, Dan. Crosscurrents in Quiet Water: Portraits of the Chesapeake. Dallas, TX: Taylor Publishing Co., 1987.
Annotation / Notes: A photo essay of the changing lives of the Eastern Shore's peoples focusing on watermen, boat builders, environmentalists, and chicken farmers. Special emphasis is placed on Smith Island and Crisfield. Photographs by Jon Naso and Marion Warren.
Fusonie, Alan, and Donna Jean. George Washington, Pioneer Farmer. Mount Vernon, VA: Mt. Vernon Ladies Association, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Washington's life gives many insights into colonial farming, and he had many contacts among Maryland Agriculturalists.
Hulton, Paul. America, 1585: The Complete Drawings of John White. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: These are the first "pictures" of this region, accurately depicting marine, terrestrial and avian species, and both Native Americans and sundry of their crafts. They are widely applicable to the nearby Chesapeake Indians and some drawings may directly depict Bay life because John White explored there during his stay.
Fischer, David Hackett. "John Beale Bordley, Daniel Boorstin, and the American Enlightenment." Journal of Southern History 28 (1962): 326-342.
Gibb, James G. "Using Calvert County's Agricultural Censuses: 1850-1880." Calvert Historian 5 (Fall 1990): 9-17.
Annotation / Notes: A useful introduction to an underutlized resource. This article would be worthwhile reading for anyone interested in agricultural censuses whether or not their area of study was Calvert County.
Berryman, Jack W. "John S. Skinner's American Farmer: Breeding and Racing the Maryland 'Blood Horse,' 1819-1829." Maryland Historical Magazine 76 (Summer 1981): 159-73.
Berryman, Jack W. "John Stuart Skinner and the American Farmer, 1819-1829: An Early Proponent of Rural Sports." Associates NAL Today, new series, 1 (October 1976): 11-32.
Bishko, Lucretia Ramsey. "Lafayette and the Maryland Agricultural Society:1824-1832." Maryland Historical Magazine 70 (Spring 1975): 45-67.
Boccaccio, Mary. "Maryland at the St. Louis World's Fair." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Winter 1985): 347-354.
Annotation / Notes: Boccaccio profiles the Maryland state exhibit at the 1904 St. Louis World's Fair, organized to commemorate the Louisiana Purchase one hundred years earlier. Drawing upon papers in the library of the University of Maryland College Park, she chronicles the efforts of William Amoss, who assembled the agricultural and horticultural products for a display which celebrated the state's western, southern, and central regions.
Menard, Russell R. "Population, Economy, and Society in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Spring 1984): 71- 92.
Annotation / Notes: Menard examines some of the complex social and economic patterns underlying the rapid population growth of Maryland during the seventeenth century despite strong in-migration, high mortality, a shortage of females, and later marriage which often produced unstable family life. Tobacco exports rose dramatically, but the economy eventually suffered from over-dependence on a single crop. Though the colony was established with aristocratic goals, immigrants and their offspring initially created a social and economic pattern in which small planters predominated. However, by the century's end a new gentry class clearly had emerged in an order characterized by greater dependence on slave labor, a decline of indentured servitude, and heightened degrees of inequality.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Feeding Eighteenth-Century Tidewater Town Folk, or, Whence the Beef?" Agricultural History 73 (Summer 1999): 267-80.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Planter's Wife: The Experience of White Women in Seventeenth Century Maryland." William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series 34 (October 1977): 542-71.
Annotation / Notes: Most women coming to Maryland in the seventeenth century were indentured servants between ages eighteen and twenty-five. Hard work in the tobacco fields, late marriage, and early death awaited them. However, for the woman who survived seasoning and their period of service, the sexual imbalance let them choose her husband and seize the opportunity to become a planter's wife. She risked childbirth, bore three to four children, and hoped one or two lived to adulthood. Widows remarried quickly, and complex families were the norm.
Hood, Margaret School. Margaret School Hood Diary, 1851-1861. Camden, ME: Picton Press, 1992.