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Erlick, David P. "The Peales and Gas Lights in Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Spring 1985): 9-18.
Annotation / Notes: In 1816 Baltimore became the first city lite by gas lighting. What began as exhibitions at the Peale Museum became the Gas Light Company of Baltimore.
Fee, Elizabeth, et. al. "Baltimore by Bus: Steering a New Course through the City's History." Radical History Review 28-30 (1984): 206-216.
Annotation / Notes: A discussion of the development of the alternative, left oriented "People's Bus Tour" of Baltimore. The tour's intention was to demonstrate the diversity of Baltimore and to show the conflicts and processes that affected the City's working class. Class relations are interpreted throughout Baltimore's history by visiting significant and visually interesting places.
Fee, Elizabeth, Linda Shopes, and Linda Zeidman, eds. The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 1991.
Annotation / Notes: Eleven essays documenting the working class history of Baltimore, stretching across many of Baltimore's neighborhoods -- from Federal Hill to Hampden, Edmondson Village to Dundalk. This work grew out of a "People's History Tour of Baltimore." Each chapter includes a map of relevant sites. There are fifteen interviews. It is well illustrated and includes an excellent bibliography.
Files, Karen. Howard County's Haunted Houses. Ellicott City, MD: Howard County Public School System, 1990.
Ford, Elise. "Happy Anniversaries." Mid-Atlantic Country 16 (May 1995): 78-81.
Annotation / Notes: Annapolis.
Forman, Henry Chandlee. The Rolling Year on Maryland's Upper Eastern Shore. Centreville, MD: Corsica Bookshop, 1985.
Fox, Jeanette L. "The Settlement of Wickliff's Creek." Chronicles of St. Mary's 31 (September 1983): 81-88.
Annotation / Notes: Wickliff's Creek was an unusual community of freeholds in a colony of largely manorial landholdings. Due to the nature of freeholding, the early settlers were able to be economically successful and politically active, however, the nature of the community, which allowed the landowners to become successful with little, if any, initial backing, limited expansion, kept the community from growing and most settlers emigrated.
Frank, Beryl. Way Back When in Sudbrook Park. Baltimore: Sudbrook Park, Inc., 1997.
Annotation / Notes: The major focus of this work are the one to two pages, illustrated, histories of 17 selected houses. Although architecture is mentioned, the major focus is on the lives of the people who occupied the houses. Their is a description of community life by the activities of the months. Over 60 people were interviewed for this work.
Freeman, Roland L. The Arabbers of Baltimore. Centerville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1989.
Annotation / Notes: A history of a people, not a place, yet the photographs clearly show the streets and the alleys of Baltimore in a way not usually documented.
Friedrichs, Jurgen, and Allen C. Goodman. The Changing Downtown: A Comparative Study of Baltimore and Hamburg. Berlin and New York: W. de Gruyter, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: A multidiscplinary study of the changing economic, social, and cultural role of Baltimore's downtown, many roles have been altered due to the growth of the metropolitan area. Urban downtowns are simply not as important as they once were.
Glass, Jesse, comp. Ghosts and Legends of Carroll County, MD. Westminster, MD: Carroll County Public Library, 1982.
Gray, Ralph D., and Gerald E. Hartdagen. "A Glimpse of Baltimore Society in 1827: Letters by Henry D. Gilpin." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Fall 1974): 256-70.
Annotation / Notes: Gilpin, a young lawyer from Philadelphia, wrote five lengthy letters to his father while visiting the Baltimore area in September, 1827. He described the people he met, many of whom were very important in Baltimore society, many were also the family and associates of Charles Carroll of Carrollton. In these letters he presents an insightful view of the life of the area's upper class. Of special interest is his descriptions of the major houses of Doughoregan Manor, Homewood, and Oakland.
Greaver, Earl R. Greenbelt: The History of a New Town, 1937-1987. Greenbelt, MD: City of Greenbelt, 1987.
Greenberg, Amy Sophia. "Mayhem in Mobtown: Firefighting in Antebellum Baltimore." Maryland Historical Magazine 90 (Summer 1995): 164-79.
Annotation / Notes: In the early nineteenth century there were no professional firefighters, the volunteers who served this role were disorderly and violent. Baltimore was known as having the worst. They frequently rioted and were a threat to public safety. Over time both internal and external efforts were used to restrain them.
Greene, Carroll, Jr. "The Rebuff That Inspired a Town." Maryland 7 (Summer 1975): 49-52.
Annotation / Notes: Highland Beach.
Grimes, Michael A. The Development of Baltimore's Northwest Corridor, 1919-1930. Columbus, OH: Society for American City and Regional Planning History, 1989.
Gude, Gilbert. Where the Potomac Begins: A History of the North Branch Valley. Cabin John, MD: Seven Locks, Press, 1984.
Annotation / Notes: A history of the coal communities of Kemptown, MD, and Elk Garden, WV. Nicely illustrated, including 1939 Farm Security Administration photos, by John Vachon, of the Kemptwon miners and their families.
Guy, Mrs. Bernard. "Bloomington's Civic Club." Glades Star 5 (September 1979): 170-73, 190.
Hammett, Regina Combs. "Leonardtown, Maryland." Chronicles of St. Mary's 28 (October 1980): 233-56.