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Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
DeGast, Robert. Western Wind, Eastern Shore: A Sailing Cruise Around the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1975.
Annotation / Notes: De Gast sails a small boat around the entire DelMarVa Peninsula, an interesting voyage with useful observations.
Footner, Hulbert. Rivers of the Eastern Shore. Seventeen Maryland Rivers. New York: Holt Reinhart and Winston, 1944.
Annotation / Notes: Footner writes mostly stories about history, but he does view Chesapeake river environments from a mid-1940s perspective.
Keiper, Ronald R. Assateague Ponies. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1985.
Keiper, Ronald R. "Matapeake State Park." Isle of Kent (Spring 1999): 4.
Walters, Keith. "Fishing Historic La Trappe Creek." Maryland 20 (Summer 1988): 78-79.
Wroten, William H. Jr. Assateague. 1970; 2d edition, Cambridge, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1972.
Preston, Dickson J. "Burgess Eastern Shore Early Americana Museum." Peninsula Pacemaker 20 (August 1992): 22-23.
Preston, Dickson J. "Maryland's Best Kept Humanities Secret: Burgess Early Americana Museum." Maryland Humanities (March/April 1994): 27.
Burris, Anne E. "Little-Known Resting Place of Some Ringgolds." Old Kent 15 (Spring 1998): 3.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Standard of Living in the Colonial Chesapeake." William and Mary Quarterly 45 (January 1988): 135-59.
Annotation / Notes: Carr and Walsh make detailed use of probate records from seventeenth and eighteenth century Maryland to argue that the period in Chesapeake area history represented a shift from an early emphasis upon material necessities to an improved standard of living marked by "gentility." The authors contend that this change reached across class lines and helped to fuel, rather than check, the productive economy of the colony. The article includes extensive tables and graphs of evidence regarding consumer items for several Maryland and Virginia counties.
Coers, D. V. "New Light on the Composition of Ebenezer Cook's Sot-Weed Factor." American Literature 49 (January 1978): 604-06.
Annotation / Notes: Coers offers evidence to support the contention that Ebenezer Cook's satire The Sot-Weed Factor was likely written no earlier than 1702, later than the 1695 date previously ascribed. He draws upon internal references in Cook's writing to Queen Anne, not crowned monarch until 1702, and a Dorchester County Court land record to support his case. The later date would suggest that the work was based on his visit to Maryland in the 1690s, but not written until afterwards.
DeSocio, Chuck. "Cecil County Plays Ball." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County 70 (Spring 1995): 1, 4-5.
Dodds, Richard J. S. "For God and Country: The Hambleton Family of Maryland." Historical Society of Talbot County Newsletter (Fall 1988): 1-2.
Historical Society of Talbot County. The Art of Gardening: Maryland Landscapes and the American Garden Aesthetic, 1730-1930. Easton, MD: The Historical Society of Talbot County, 1985.
Horne, Patricia E. The Organizational Network of Kent County, Maryland: 1650-1800. Ph.D. diss., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 1973.
Horton, Tom. An Island Out of Time: A Memoir of Smith Island in the Chesapeake. New York, W. W. Norton and Company, 1996.
Annotation / Notes: Horton's title suggests his principal themes in examining Smith Island life: that the islands represent a distinctive way of life rooted in another time whose preservation into the future may literally be running out of time. An environmental columnist for the Baltimore Sun who lived on Smith Island in the late 1980s as an environmental educator with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Horton examines the water-related economy, traditionally based on oystering and crabbing, and the unique way of life that evolved in the relative isolation of the island communities. His book profiles the personalities of Smith Island, the work of men and women, the pervasive role of religion in island life, and social, economic, and environmental changes threatening the island's future.
Horton, Tom. "The Hyer-Sullivan Match." Kent Shoreman 9 (September 1974): 45-47.
Lewis, Sara. "Sailing at Ocean City." Heartland of Del-Mar-Va 11 (Sunshine 1988): 150-53.
Lewis, Sara. "Recipes and Home Cures from the 1840's." Bulletin of the Historical Society of Cecil County. 55 (January 1992): 1-2.
Robson, Nancy Taylor. "The Ghosts of Kent County." Maryland 27 (September/October 1995): 24-25, 27.
Russo, Jean B. "The Constables' Lists: An Invaluable Resource." Maryland Historical Magazine 85 (Summer 1990): 164-70.
Russo, Jean B. "St. Martin's Camp." Isle of Kent (Spring 1993): 1-2.