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Brackett, Jeffrey Richardson. The Negro in Maryland: A Study of the Institution of Slavery, extra vol. 6. Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University, 1889.
Brown, C. Christopher. "Maryland's First Political Convention by and for Its Colored People." Maryland Historical Magazine 88 (Fall 1993): 324-36.
Annotation / Notes: In 1852, forty-one African American delegates formed the first Colored Convention in Baltimore. Given the increasing restrictions on the mobility and employment opportunities available to free blacks since the early 19th century, the convention addressed the possibility of emigration to Liberia. For many black Marylanders, emigration appeared to be the only real political choice left to free blacks in the 1850s. Discussion of colonization before 1852 had been mostly a white concern, although there had been several black colonization societies as well. In the end, however, few Maryland blacks embraced colonization.
Burkhart, Lynne C. Old Values in a New Town: The Politics of Race and Class in Columbia, Maryland. New York: Praeger, 1981.
Calderhead, William. "How Extensive Was the Border State Slave Trade? A New Look." Civil War History 18 (1972): 42-55.
Callcott, Margaret Law. "Inventory of a Maryland Slave Cabin." Riversdale Letter 12 (Spring 1995): 2-4.
Diggs, Louis S. Since the Beginning: African American Communities in Towson. Baltimore: Uptown Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: East Towson, Sandy Bottom, Lutherville, Schwartz Avenue.
Ellefson, C. Ashley. "Free Jupiter and the Rest of the World: the Problem of a Free Negro in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 66 (1971): 1-13.
Eltis, David. The Rise of African Slavery in the Americas. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2000.
Farquhar, Roger Brooke, III. "Slavery Ebbed Early in Sandy Spring." Legacy 17 (Winter 1997): 1, 7.
Favor, Homer Eli. The Effects of Racial Changes in Occupancy Patterns upon Property Values in Baltimore. Ph.D. diss., University of Pittsburgh, 1960.
Fields, Barbara Jeanne. Slavery and Freedom on the Middle Ground: Maryland during the Nineteenth Century. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985.
Annotation / Notes: The author explores how free populations in Maryland - both black and white - challenged the notion of a slave society. The free black population, very much interconnected with the slave population in terms of kinship ties, also provided a threat to the underpinnings of the system. Once freedom arrived, social relationships also had to be redefined. The author writes that "free blacks did not occupy a unique or legitimate place within Maryland society, but instead formed an anomalous adjunct to the slave population" (3). By 1840, free blacks in Maryland composed 41% of the total black population of the state, or the largest free black population of any state in the nation.
Fuke, Richard Paul. Imperfect Equality: African Americans and the Confines of White Racial Attitudes in Post-Emancipation Maryland. New York: Fordham University Press, 1999.
Garonzik, Joseph. Urbanization and the Black Population of Baltimore, 1850-1870. Ph.D. diss., State University of New York, Stony Brook, 1974.
Goldin, Claudia Dale. Urban Slavery in the American South 1820-1860: A Quantitative History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: Numerous references to Baltimore.
Graham, Leroy. Baltimore: The Nineteenth Century Black Capital. Washington, DC: University Press of America, Inc., 1982.
Groves, Paul A., and Edward K. Muller. "The Evolution of Black Residential Areas in Late Nineteenth-Century Cities." Journal of Historical Geography 1 (April 1975): 169-91.
Annotation / Notes: Includes Baltimore.
Hicks, Helena S. The Black Apprentice in Maryland Court Records from 1661 to 1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland at College Park, 1988.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the apprenticeship system in Maryland as related to blacks during the period 1661 to 1865. For blacks in Maryland, apprenticeship was one of the earliest forms of education available. Court records are used to examine Maryland's apprenticeship system. Although Maryland's apprenticeship law of 1793 eliminated the reading and writing requirement for apprentices in the case of black apprentices, black apprentices' contracts still contained literacy provisions. Employment in various trade was another benefit resulting from the apprenticeship system.
Holland, Marcella. "Emergence of Maryland's African-American Women Attorneys." Maryland Bar Journal 28 (July 1995): 14-19.
Johnson, Whittington B. "The Origin and Nature of African Slavery in Seventeenth-Century Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (September 1978): 236-45.
Kulikoff, Alan. Tobacco and Slaves: The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, 1986.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. "Slave Families at Early Chesapeake Ironworks." Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 86 (April 1978): 169-79.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the self-determination on the part of blacks enslaved as ironworkers in order to counter the view of the fragmented black family as espoused by scholars such as E. Franklin Frazier and Daniel P. Moynihan. The author examines such Maryland ironworks as Northampton Furnace and Patuxent Iron Works. Ironworkers were provided opportunities for "overwork" - that is, working overtime in return for cash or supplies. The money allowed ironworkers and their families an improved standard of living. In addition, ironworkers did not experience strict controls over their free time, home life, or leisure activities. These factors, the author feels, contributed to a stable family structure among enslaved ironworkers.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. Slavery in the Chesapeake Iron Industry, 1716-1865. Ph.D. diss., University of Akron, 1974.
Lewis, Ronald Loran. "Slavery on Chesapeake Iron Plantations Before the American Revolution." Journal of Negro History 59 (July 1974): 242-54.
Maryland-National Capital Park, and Planning Commission. The Social and Economic Status of the Black Population in Prince George's County, 1970-1980. Hyattsville, MD: The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, 1985.
Menard, Russell R. "From Servants to Slaves: The Transformation of the Chesapeake Labor System." Southern Studies 16 (Winter 1977): 355-90.