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Menard, Russell R. "The Maryland Slave Population, 1658 to 1730: A Demographic Profile of Blacks in Four Counties." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 33 (January 1975): 29-54.
Morgan, Edmund S. American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia. New York: W. W. Norton and Co., 1975.
Morgan, Kenneth. "Slave Sales in Colonial Charleston." English Historical Review 113 (September 1998): 905-27.
Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia. "Black Housing Patterns in Baltimore City, 1885 - 1953." The Maryland Historian 16 (Spring/Summer 1985): 25-39.
Orser, W. Edward. "Secondhand Suburbs: Black Pioneers in Baltimore's Edmondson Village, 1955-1980." Urban History 16 (May 1990): 227-62.
Phillips, Christopher William. 'Negroes and Other Slaves:' The African-American Community of Baltimore, 1790-1860. Ph.D. diss., University of Georgia, 1992.
Schiller, Bradley R. The Economics of Poverty in Maryland. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1973.
Skotnes, Andor D. The Black Freedom Movement and the Workers' Movement in Baltimore, 1930-1939. Ph.D. diss., Rutgers University, New Brunswick, 1991.
Skotnes, A. "'Buy Where You Can Work:' Boycotting for Jobs in African-American Baltimore, 1933-1934." Journal of Social History 27 (Summer 1994): 735-61.
Sutherland, Hunter. "Slavery in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 35 (Winter 1988): 19-27.
Walsh, Lorena S. "Rural African Americans in the Constitutional Era in Maryland, 1776-1810." Maryland Historical Magazine 84 (1989): 327-41.
Annotation / Notes: The author examines the changing working conditions and differing experiences of slaves on six Maryland plantations during the Constitutional Era. Tasks varied by plantation, as did the family life of the enslaved population. The author uses correspondence and plantation records to attempt to reconstruct the daily lives of the enslaved on these plantations.
Wax, Darold D. "Black Immigrants: The Slave Trade in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (March 1978): 30-45.
West, Herbert Lee, Jr. Urban Life and Spatial Distribution of Blacks in Baltimore, Maryland. Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1974.
Annotation / Notes: 1940-70.
Arnold, Joseph L. "The Neighborhood and City Hall: The Origins of Neighborhood Associations in Baltimore, 1880-1911." Journal of Urban History 6 (November 1979): 3-30.
Beirne, D. Randall. "Hampden - Woodberry: The Mill Village in an Urban Setting." Maryland Historical Magazine 77 (Spring 1982): 6-26.
Annotation / Notes: Although this Baltimore neighborhood is no longer a mill town, the area's geographic and social isolation has allowed it, in many ways, to preserve its mill town character. It is a largely homogenous community, predominantly working class.
Bernard, Richard M. "A Portrait of Baltimore in 1800: Economic and Occupational Patterns in an Early American City." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Winter 1974): 341-60.
Annotation / Notes: This study looks at the social structure and physical location of Baltimore's population during its boom period. The author found Baltimore's rich and poor isolated from each other and the middle class decentralized. Many Baltimoreans worked near their home, while this allowed for the intermixing of people of different occupations, it kept different communities isolated from each other.
Bosanko, Ed. Triumph and Tradition: Firefighting in Prince George's County, Maryland, 1887-1990. Baltimore: John D. Lucas Printing Company, 1990.
Breihan, Jack. "Necessary Visions: Community Planning in Wartime." Maryland Humanities (November 1998): 11-14.
Annotation / Notes: During World War II, as a result of the growth of the domestic immigration of industrial workers, two planned communities were developed in the Baltimore metropolitan area. The first of these was Baltimore County's Middle River, a community for whites, a project of the Martin aircraft plant. The second was Cherry Hill, a south Baltimore, black community. They were both garden suburbs focused on a central commercial center.
Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene. Baltimore, An Illustrated History. American Historical Press, 2000.
Annotation / Notes: A history of Baltimore, 1608-2000, for the general reader. A chronological history is presented which touches upon growth, politics, economics, education, cultural organizations, etc. Included at the end is a series of approximately 45 histories of leading 20th century businesses, companies, and organizations.
Curry, Leonard P. "Urbanization and Urbanism in the Old South: A Comparative View." Journal of Southern History 40 (February 1974): 43-60.
Annotation / Notes: Baltimore is included in this author's study of the South's pre-1850 urban centers. Curry argues that these centers are often ignored in historian's views of the Old South even though some of the nation's largest cities were located in that region. Contrary to general view, the South did have urban and commercial centers and had more than a passing interest in manufacturing.
Delorenzo, Lisa Christine. Neighborhood Stability and Urban Policy: Fortifying the Link. Ph.D. diss., University of Missouri-St. Louis, 1997.
Dombrowski, Esther. "The Homefront: Harford County During World War II, Part I." Harford Historical Bulletin 65 (Summer 1995): 107-52; "Part II."Harford Historical Bulletin 66 (Fall 1995): 155-204.
Dombrowski, Esther. Dundalk, Then & Now 1894-1980. Dundalk, MD: Dundalk-Patapsco Neck Historical Society, 1980.
Dürr, William Theodore. The Conscience of A City: A History of the Citizen's Planning and Housing Association and Efforts to Improve Housing for the Poor in Baltimore, Maryland, 1937-1954. Ph.D. diss., Johns Hopkins University, 1972.