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Sutherland, Hunter. "Slavery in Harford County." Harford Historical Bulletin 35 (Winter 1988): 19-27.
Walsh, Lorena S. Charles County, Maryland, 1658-1705: A Study of Chesapeake Social and Political Structure. Ph.D. diss., Michigan State University, 1977.
Walsh, Lorena S. "The Chesapeake Slave Trade: Regional Patterns, African Origins, and Some Implications." William and Mary Quarterly 58 (2001): 139-70.
Wax, Darold D. "Black Immigrants: The Slave Trade in Colonial Maryland." Maryland Historical Magazine 73 (March 1978): 30-45.
Wicek, William M. "The Statutory Law of Slavery and Race in the Thirteen Mainland Colonies of British America." William and Mary Quarterly, 3d ser., 34 (1977): 258-80.
Wright, James M. The Free Negro in Maryland, 1634-1860. Vol. 917, no. 3. Columbia University Studies in History. New York: Columbia University, 1921.
Baker, Nancy T. "Annapolis, Maryland, 1695-1730." Maryland Historical Magazine 81 (Fall 1986): 191-209.
Annotation / Notes: This study describes the first phase in Annapolis's development as an urban center. It covers the period in which the community progressed from a settlement to a city. This period was marked by three patterns of development -- the acquisition of land, a growth in the population, and the town's evolution as a market for imported goods.
Fox, Jeanette L. "The Settlement of Wickliff's Creek." Chronicles of St. Mary's 31 (September 1983): 81-88.
Annotation / Notes: Wickliff's Creek was an unusual community of freeholds in a colony of largely manorial landholdings. Due to the nature of freeholding, the early settlers were able to be economically successful and politically active, however, the nature of the community, which allowed the landowners to become successful with little, if any, initial backing, limited expansion, kept the community from growing and most settlers emigrated.
Hienton, Louise Joyner. "Sidelights: Charles Town, Prince George's First County Seat." Maryland Historical Magazine 63 (1968): 401-411.
Annotation / Notes: The author presents a narrative description of Charles Town during its hey day as an economic center. She lists the land owners, the store owners, the justicies of the County, and other political figures. With improved roads and increasing population settlement in the north, Charles Town was replaced in 1721 as the County seat.
Pogue, Dennis J. "Calverton, Calvert County, Maryland, 1668-1725." Calvert Historian 9 (Spring 1994): 68-79.
Pogue, Dennis J. "Calverton, Calvert County, Maryland: 1668-1725." Maryland Historical Magazine 80 (Winter 1985): 371-376.
Annotation / Notes: Calverton, the originally county seat of Calvert County, was one of the few towns in Colonial Southern Maryland. The discovery of an 1862 plat of this town, the earliest know plat of a Maryland town, greatly added to the information available on the town. Calverton is now believed to be of much greater importance than previously thought. It was an prominent governmental, economic, and population center.
Riley, Elihu S. "The Ancient City." History of Annapolis, in Maryland. 1649-1887. 1887; reprint, Annapolis: Anne Arundel County Bicentennial Commission, 1976.
Annotation / Notes: A reprint of an 1887 work. It is largely arranged by date, presenting important events which occurred in the city during the years. Interspersed amongst these dates are occasional chapters written on a theme, covering a span of years, such as theater, the state house, and "Illustrious Anapolitans." It is very well indexed and includes an abridgement of Father Andrew White's Journal.
Thomas, Joseph B., Jr., and Anthony D. Lindauer. "Seeking Herrington: Settlement in a Very Early Maryland Town." Maryland Archeology 34 (September 1998): 11-17.
Annotation / Notes: Herrington, in southern Anne Arundel, was one of many very small towns in Maryland during the Colonial period. These towns generally had no municipal government. To research such communities scholars must rely on governmental records documenting landowners and residents. After Herrington's demise, shortly after 1700, the area remained predominantly agricultural. This resulted in its location remaining largely intact. Thus, it is a promising archeological site for research.
Brewington, M. V. Chesapeake Bay: A Pictorial Maritime History. 1953; 2d edition, New York: Bonanza Books, 1956.
Annotation / Notes: While primarily about boats on the Bay, Brewington's book has many contemporary environmental insights.
Capper, John, Garrett Power, and Frank Shivers. Chesapeake Waters: Pollution, Public Health and Public Opinion, 1602-1972. Centreville, MD: Tidewater Publishers, 1983.
Clayton, John Edmund, and Dorothy Berkeley, eds. "Another Account of Virginia." The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 76 (1687): 415-436.
Annotation / Notes: This is a convenient abstract of Clayton's Virginia descriptions, equally applicable to Maryland, discussing a wide variety of animals and plants, their uses and special characters. The Reverend Clayton wrote considerably more.
Force, Peter. Tracts and Other Papers Relating Principally to the Origin, Settlement, and Progress of the Colonies in North America: From the Discovery of the Country to the Year 1776. Washington, DC: Peter Force, 1836.
Annotation / Notes: At least Volumes I, and IV contain material relevant to Chesapeake Environment. Force performed a valuable service codifying and publishing these in the early nineteenth century, before some of the sources were lost. Volume IV contains Colony founder Father Andrew White's "Relation" of Maryland to Lord Baltimore, and his "Narrative of a Voyage to Virginia". In the relation of events of 1642 the text records what is plausibly, the first and only lethal shark attack in Chesapeake history. p. 37 in Force's Vol. IV.
Haile, Edward Wright, ed. Jamestown Narratives: Eyewitness accounts of the Virginia Colony. The first decade 1607-1617. Champlain, VA: RoundHouse, 1998.
Annotation / Notes: Haile has brought together a large part of the early published accounts of Chesapeake settlement, within the texts of which are hundreds of references and vignettes about the seventeenth century environment.
Kent, Bretton W. Making Dead Oysters Talk. 1988; rev. ed. Crownsville, MD: Maryland Historical Trust, Historic St. Mary's City Commission and Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum, 1992.
Annotation / Notes: Kent's analyses of oysters from archaeological sites, tell a cautionary tale of overharvest which went unheeded for three centuries.
Kiger, Robert W., Galvin D. R. Bridson, and Donna M. Connelly, eds. Huntia. Vol 7. Pittsburgh: Carnegie Institute of Technology. Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, 1987.
Annotation / Notes: In this volume contributors James Reveal, George Frick, Melvin Brown and Rose Broome lay out a remarkable history of Maryland (and the Chesapeake's) earliest botanists, their personal stories, their observations and collections, which are still preserved at the British Museum in London. This is technical material, but salted in are the remarkable human stories and insights into a Chesapeake different from today.
Maryland Hall of Records Commission. A Declaration of the Lord Baltemore's Plantation in Mary-land. 1663; reprint, Annapolis, MD: Maryland Hall of Records Commission, Department of General Services, 1983.
Annotation / Notes: This booklet, issued as part of Maryland's 350th year, includes a facsimile of Lord Baltimore's original description of Maryland's natural resources (plus a remarkable explanation of the Gulf Stream and coastal fisheries!) , and an announcement that the ship "Arke of Mary-land" would sail August 20th, 1633.
Middleton, Arthur Pierce. Tobacco Coast. 1953; reprint, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Middleton, subsequently a retired Episcopal Canon, for years directed work at Colonial Williamsburg. This defining volume on Chesapeake Maritime History contains valuable environmental references coupled to the region's colonial economy.
Miller, Henry M. "Transforming a 'Splendid and Delightsome Land:' Colonists and Ecological Change in the Chesapeake, 1670 - 1820." Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences 76 (September 1986): 173-87.
Smith, John. The General Historie of Virginia, New England and the Summer Isles. 1624; reprint, Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, 1966.
Annotation / Notes: Facsimile, also reissued by World Publishing, Cleveland, OH. This volume is as close to reading the original as most of us will get. John Smith was the first environmental observer of Bay and watershed, and his insights are sobering when one contemplates the changes we have wrought.
Cox, Richard J. Historic Documents Relating to the Early Days of the Colony of Maryland: A Descriptive Catalog of the Exhibition Held at the Central Library in Celebration of the Nation's Bicentennial. Baltimore: Enoch Pratt Free Library, 1976.