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Walsh, Lorena S. "Land, Landlord, and Leaseholder: Estate Management and Tenant Fortunes in Southern Maryland, 1642-1820." Agricultural History 59 (July 1985): 373-396.
Annotation / Notes: Based on the astonishing records of a Jesuit-owned estate in Charles County that lasted for 175 years, Walsh examined 233 tenants, and the effect of their short term vs. long term leases on resource waste or conservation. The story explains how owners used leasing as a means for plantation development and as an alternative to slave labor.
Blake, Allison. The Chesapeake Bay Book: A Complete Guide. 3rd edition. Lee, MA: Berkshire House Publishers, 1997.
Annotation / Notes: A well researched tour guide for the general population.
Carr, Lois Green. "The Metropolis of Maryland': A Comment on Town Development Along the Tobacco Coast." Maryland Historical Magazine 69 (Summer 1974): 124-45.
Annotation / Notes: Many towns in the Chesapeake area failed during the seventeenth century. Towns were not needed as commercial centers for the tobacco trade, the major economy of the area at that time. Carr uses St. Mary's City as an example of such a failure.
Chesser, Helen Brown. "St. George Island Memories." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 98-104.
Annotation / Notes: The memories of a woman who grew up on the Island during the early decades of the twentieth century.
Cronin, William B. "St. George's Island." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 19 (May 1989): 44-47.
Earle, Swepson. The Chesapeake Bay Country. Baltimore: Thomsen-Ellis Company, 1923.
Annotation / Notes: Divided into three regions -- southeastern Maryland, Upper Bay, and the Eastern Shore, this work includes a history for each, written by five noted authors, followed by a description of the counties in each, along with places of interest and the people of these places. The histories of the areas places special emphasis on major houses and genealogy of the owners. It is nicely illustrated with contemporary photographs, which nearly 80 years later serve as historic images. There are four pages of interesting photos of African Americans.
Himmelheber, Peter. "St. George's Island Revisited." Chronicles of St. Mary's 46 (Winter 1998): 332-37.
Lumpkins, Maggie Henderson. "Memories of St. George Island." Chronicles of St. Mary's 40 (Spring 1992): 104-6.
Reps, John. Tidewater Towns: City Planning in Colonial Virginia and Maryland. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1972.
Annotation / Notes: Early towns did not generally spring out of nowhere. Town planning was common and an important part of Chesapeake Maryland's colonial history. The government played an active role in the founding and formation of towns. Annapolis and the District of Columbia were unique in that their plans did not resemble those common amongst other English colonies.
Veitch, Fletcher. "Hurricane of 1933." Chronicles of St. Mary's 33 (August 1985): 285-288.
Wilstach, Paul. Tidewater Maryland. Indianapolis, IN: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1931.
Annotation / Notes: A narrative history of those Maryland counties, all but seven of the twenty-three, touched by saltwater, arranged by theme and locale. There is a great deal of emphasis on the founding of towns and important personages, a wide variety of subjects are covered.
Vogt, Peter R. "Southern Maryland in Deep Time; A Brief History of our Geology, Part II: The Post-Breakup Sediment Wedge." Bugeye Times 23 (Spring 1998): 1, 6-7.
Dessaint, Alain. Southern Maryland Directory: A Guide to Researching the Region's Past. Prince Frederick, MD: Southern Maryland Today, 1983.
Foster, Elizabeth. "A Visit to the Saint Clements Island-Potomac River Museum." Chesapeake Bay Magazine 17 (February 1988): 30-34.
Carr, Lois Green, and Lorena S. Walsh. "The Standard of Living in the Colonial Chesapeake." William and Mary Quarterly 45 (January 1988): 135-59.
Annotation / Notes: Carr and Walsh make detailed use of probate records from seventeenth and eighteenth century Maryland to argue that the period in Chesapeake area history represented a shift from an early emphasis upon material necessities to an improved standard of living marked by "gentility." The authors contend that this change reached across class lines and helped to fuel, rather than check, the productive economy of the colony. The article includes extensive tables and graphs of evidence regarding consumer items for several Maryland and Virginia counties.
Fausz, J. Frederick. "Present at the 'Creation': The Chesapeake World that Greeted the Maryland Colonists." Maryland Historical Magazine 79 (Spring 1984): 7-20.
Annotation / Notes: Fausz examines relations between Europeans (especially the English of Maryland and Virginia) and Native Americans of the Chesapeake region in the decade immediately preceding the settlement of the Maryland colony at St. Mary's in 1634. He argues that the interaction between Englishmen and Native Americans provided the basis for tobacco cultivation and the beaver fur trade. Both paved the way for successful adaption of the early English settlers to new American conditions.
Gibb, James G., and Julia A. King. "Gender, Activity Areas, and Homelots in the 17th-Century Chesapeake Region." Historical Archaeology 25 (1991): 109-131.
Annotation / Notes: Using archaeological records and spatial analysis from three Southern Maryland tobacco plantation sites, the authors provide an ethnographic look at life for seventeenth-century Maryland colonists in terms of gender and class roles. The article provides a brief overview of the economics of the Chesapeake region, the structure of living arrangements, and the gendered nature of tasks. The evidence suggests how gendered and class-based activities contributed to both household production and accrued wealth. The authors conclude that comparisons between the three sites provide the basis for understanding how household wealth was a direct corollary of the ability to secure a large work force and to develop a high degree of specialization.
Horn, James. Adapting to a New World: English Society in the Seventeenth-Century Chesapeake. Chapel Hill: Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, 1994.
Annotation / Notes: Horn examines Chesapeake society in the period 1607 to 1690 to determine the degree to which English attitudes and values persisted in the adaptation to New World conditions. He provides a comparison of the English societies from which the settlers had come (Gloucestershire and Kent as representative regions of England) to those they established in the Chesapeake region (Lower Norfolk and Lancaster Counties in Virginia serve as case studies, supplemented by considerable evidence drawn from St. Mary's County, Maryland) in terms of family, work, standard of living, social order, and religion. Horn concludes that "Maryland and Virginia society is incomprehensible without an awareness of English social development in the seventeenth century" (p. 437).
Himmelheber, Pete. "Blue Crabs and Crawdads: From the Bay to the Bayou: The Louisiana Connection." Chronicles of St. Mary's, 50 (Spring 2002): 183-87.
McNamara, Joseph M. "Submerged Terrestrial Sites and the Application of Clam Dredges in the Search for William Claiborne's 17-th Century Settlement in the Upper Chesapeake." Broadwater, John D., ed. Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from the Society for Historical Archaeology Conference. Richmond, VA: Society for Historical Archaeology, 1991, pp. 10-14.
Guy, J. S., comp. "Federal Naval Operations 1861-65." Chronicles of St. Mary's, 47 (Summer 1999): 375-79; Chronicles of St. Mary's, 47 (Fall 1999): 11-14.
Pelzer, John D., and Linda C. "The French Lady." Civil War Times Illustrated, 31 (May/June 1992): 28-31, 66-67.
Luykx, John M. "Military Naval Engagement at St. George's Island, July-August 1776." Skipjack (July 1975): 4-5.
Hall, Robert. "Point Lookout Lighthouse." Chronicles of St. Mary's, 55 (Summer 2008): 507-15.